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“This lit up our base, lit up the people that are supporters of the president," President Donald Trump's campaign manager said

By Sean Neumann
December 23, 2019 12:26 PM
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While Democrats were celebrating President Donald Trump’s impeachment last week as a “monumental victory,” conservative voters were rushing to donate to the president and the Republican Party.

According to the Associated Press, “since the impeachment proceedings began, the Republican National Committee has seen 600,000 new donors.” The AP also reports the Trump re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee took in $10 million in the 48 hours following Trump’s impeachment.

“This lit up our base, lit up the people that are supporters of the president. They’re frustrated, they’re upset, and that motivates voters,” Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale told reporters before the president’s impeachment, according to the Washington Post. “They have ignited a flame underneath them.”

President Trump was impeached last Wednesday on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of justice following a months-long investigation that found he had used the office of the presidency to bribe Ukraine for his personal gain in the 2020 election.

Trump had allegedly attempted to bribe Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky into investigating former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Biden is one of the Democratic frontrunners campaigning against President Trump in the 2020 election.

The house voted to impeach Trump on both charges, making him just the third president in United States history to ever be impeached — a lasting mark on his presidency, but one that likely won’t remove him from office. President Trump will stand a trial in the Republican-controlled Senate where it’s expected he’ll be quickly acquitted of the impeachment charges.

Trump’s push to frame the impeachment as an attack on Republican voters began the moment he was impeached. While the House was voting, Trump was standing on the stage in Battle Creek, Michigan, where he was campaigning for his re-election.

“You’re declaring open war on American democracy,” Trump told the crowd. “You are the ones interfering in America’s elections. You are the ones subverting America’s democracy. We did nothing wrong. Nothing whatsoever.”

He even framed the exact impeachment charges against the Democrats, who he said are led by “Crazy Nancy Pelosi” — the democratic speaker of the House who fronted the impeachment investigation.

“You are the ones obstructing justice,” Trump said, while the crowd cheered loudly.

The moment made it clear that the Trump 2020 campaign will lean on impeachment as an “underdog” rallying cry to rile up their Republican base, Trump’s former campaign adviser Sam Nunberg told the AP.

“The silver lining for the president with being impeached is that it gives him a continued rationale to run as the outsider who is being an attacked by the elites for trying to bring big change to Washington,” Nunberg said. “He’ll not only, as any sitting president, be able to point to what he’s accomplished, he can say ‘I was able to do all that even though I didn’t have a real first term because I was under attack from Day One.'”

In an open letter to Pelosi the day before his impeachment, Trump warned Democrats the move will come back to bite them in the 2020 election.

“This is nothing more than an illegal, partisan attempted coup that will, based on recent sentiment, badly fail at the voting booth,” Trump wrote, continuing, “I have no doubt the American people will hold you and the Democrats fully responsible in the upcoming 2020 election.”