"These comments are deeply disturbing and Leader McCarthy plans to have a conversation with the Congresswoman about them," a spokesman said

By Sean Neumann
January 28, 2021 01:15 AM
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Marjorie Taylor Greene
| Credit: Dustin Chambers/Getty

The Republican leader of the House of Representatives will reportedly have a "conversation" with newly elected Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene about her past social media activity, which shows her page endorsing calls for violence against lawmakers and support for false conspiracy theories.

A spokesman for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told Axios on Tuesday the top GOP lawmaker in the House planned to speak with Greene, a 46-year-old freshman lawmaker from Georgia, in light of the unearthed social media posts.

"These comments are deeply disturbing and Leader McCarthy plans to have a conversation with the Congresswoman about them," Mark Bednar told the outlet.

Bednar did not immediately respond when PEOPLE inquired about whether the call had happened yet and what was discussed. A spokesperson for Greene's office said they would not comment "on private member-to-member matters."

CNN reported Tuesday that Greene — a fierce Trump supporter who has received widespread criticism for previously expressing belief in the bizarre and macabre QAnon conspiracy theory — had "liked" a comment on Facebook that called for "a bullet to the head" of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Greene later denied personal responsibility for her own Facebook page's activity.

"Over the years, I've had teams of people manage my pages," she tweeted. "Many posts have been liked. Many posts have been shared. Some did not represent my views. Especially the ones that CNN is about to spread across the internet."

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene
| Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty

Old social media posts also show that Greene has endorsed a baseless belief alleging the 2018 Parkland school shooting, which killed 17 people, and the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre, were both staged.

Gun violence prevention organizations, including the March for Our Lives organization led by Parkland High School students who survived the Florida shooting, have called on Greene to resign.

In an emailed statement to PEOPLE, Greene's communications director Nick Dyer previously said: "Congresswoman Greene isn't concerned about what national Democrat fundraising groups have to say about her. She represents the people of Northwest Georgia, not special interest lobbies that oppose her strong conservatives stances."

Greene also has a history of disparaging comments about Muslims, Black people and Hispanics, according to NPR.

Greene's previously expressed belief in QAnon has sparked criticism and concern from both Democratic and Republican lawmakers in recent months.

When asked by PEOPLE, Dyer distanced the Georgia representative from the conspiracy. "She has nothing to do with QAnon. She doesn't support it. She doesn't follow it," he said. "She believes it's disinformation."

Greene indicated otherwise in 2017 and 2018, videos and social media activity show.

Her office did not respond when asked this week if the congresswoman had anything to add regarding family members of the Parkland victims who were hurt or offended by her past comment about the Parkland shooting.