A barricade was erected outside of the White House, where President Donald Trump is expected to spend much of Election Day

By Maria Pasquini
November 03, 2020 05:50 PM
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White House
| Credit: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty

As the country prepares for the end of a contentious presidential campaign, a barricade was erected around the White House.

On the eve of Election Day, “non-scalable” fencing was temporarily put up around the perimeter of the White House, where President Donald Trump is expected to spend most of the day. A similar barricade was erected around the White House in June amid protests over the killing of George Floyd.

According to CNN, the fencing is around 8 feet high and workers carried on through the night to complete the project.

Photos captured on Election Day also show that in some areas, a variety of posters — some of which call for Trump to be removed from office — have been put up on the fencing.

A White House spokesman referred questions to the Secret Service and a spokeswoman for the Secret Service told PEOPLE: “As a matter of practice, the Secret Service does not comment on the means and methods used to carry out our protective operations.”

The National Park Service also released a notice to the public regarding temporary security modifications, including area closures.

Fencing around the perimeter of the White House
| Credit: John Minchillo/AP/Shutterstock
White House fencing
| Credit: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty
Protest posters on White House barricades
| Credit: Vladimir Kostyrev/TASS via Getty

Amid mounting anxiety about the results of the general election, officials in D.C. have warned about the possibility of “civil unrest.” A number of businesses located near the White House have also boarded up their windows.

“It is widely believed that there will be civil unrest after the November election regardless of who wins,” D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham told lawmakers last month, according to The Washington Post.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser went on to add that the city has been planning its public safety approach “for many weeks if not months.”

So far, the city has only announced that it will be implementing parking restrictions in downtown D.C. due to multiple “First Amendment demonstrations” scheduled to take place on Election Day.

Although city officials have been making preparations to ensure public safety throughout the aftermath of the election, according to ABC News, Mayor Bowser has said she has not requested help from the National Guard.