The trip will be full of royal pageantry, D-Day commemorations — and protests

By Matt McNulty
May 31, 2019 03:26 PM

President Donald Trump is making his first-ever state visit to the U.K. next week, and the trip across the pond will be full of royal pageantry, D-Day commemorations — and protests.

In addition to marking the 75th anniversary of the historic Normandy landing, Trump will meet with members of the royal family, including Queen Elizabeth, as well as the Prime Minister Theresa May to celebrate the U.S. alliance with the U.K.

He will also visit France and Ireland during his four-day tour of Europe.

Here is what we know about the trip.

1. Where Is He Going and for How Long?

Trump arrives in the U.K. on Monday and will be there for a three-day visit. During his stay, he will travel to London and Portsmouth in England, and then on Wednesday he reportedly heads to the Shannon Airport and Doonbeg Hotel in Ireland.

In England, he will attend a mix of ceremonial events marking his visit as well as political engagements, including a bilateral meeting with May, the departing prime minister. He will likewise meet with Ireland’s leader, Leo Varadkar.

On Thursday, he will go to France for another round of D-Day commemorations and meetings, including with President Emmanuel Macron.

2. Who Will Come with Him?

The president will be joined on the trip by his wife, First Lady Melania Trump.

He will also reportedly be accompanied for at least part of the trip by his adult children and their spouses: Ivanka, 37, and her husband Jared Kushner, 38, (both of whom are senior aides) as well as Donald Trump Jr., 41, Tiffany, 25, Eric Trump, 35, and Eric’s wife, Laura, 36.

Speaking with reporters on Thursday, ahead of the state visit, administration officials declined to confirm who from Trump’s family might join him in the U.K. or why they might travel with him.

The White House did not respond to PEOPLE’s questions on the matter.

RELATED: Trump Will Make His First State Visit to the U.K. at Queen Elizabeth’s Invitation After Previous Trip Drew Protests

From left: Queen Elizabeth with President Donald Trump during his working visit to the U.K. last year
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty
A protest during President Donald Trump's visit to the U.K. last year
Finbarr Webster/Shutterstock

3. Will There Be Protests?

Yes. For example, demonstrators reportedly plan to take over Trafalgar Square in central London.

Funds are being raised by the Facebook group “Together Against Trump – Stop the State Visit” to fly a giant balloon of a baby Trump, similar to last year, when the president made a working visit to the U.K.

“This is about sending a strong message that people in the U.K. don’t accept the divisive right-wing policies that Trump stands for, and that inviting him for a state visit is totally inappropriate,” the Stop Trump Coalition said in a statement.

Trump told The Sun last year that while he loves the city of London, the protests and balloon “didn’t make him feel welcome.”

4. Why Is He Going Now?

The timing for President Trump’s first state visit to the U.K. is officially due to the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the day when Allied forces invaded northern France in Normandy during World War II.

“There is no better time to have a state visit to the United Kingdom than the 75th anniversary of D-Day,” a senior administration official told reporters on Thursday. “It’s also very special to be able to commemorate the events of D-Day on both sides of the English Channel, in Portsmouth and then in Caen, in Normandy.”

However, Trump’s state visit has been conspicuously delayed throughout his presidency.

RELATED: Will the Royals Meet Trump’s Children? Ivanka, Don Jr. & Eric Reportedly to Attend State Banquet

Trump was first invited for a state visit — an offer that must be extended by the Queen — in 2017 right after being sworn into office. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama previously visited in 2011, and before them President George W. Bush and First Lady Bush visited in 2003. (The Queen has made four state visits to the U.S., most recently in 2007.)

But Trump’s official state trip was repeatedly delayed, with speculation that it was due to worries over the protests he might face. Among other controversies in his relationship with Britain, Trump sparked backlash in June 2017 after he attacked London’s mayor in the wake of a terror attack there.

In July he met with the Queen Elizabeth at Windsor Castle amid the expected protests about his working trip. A “Stop Trump March” in London drew tens of thousands of people.

From left: First Lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump
Leon Neal/Getty

5. What About the Royals?

The White House said that during next week’s trip, Trump will be greeted with a ceremonial welcome upon his arrival on Monday before having lunch with the Queen and partaking in an extravagant white-tie state banquet at Buckingham Palace.

The president and first lady will be taken on a tour of the Royal Collection, with items celebrating the U.K.’s history and special relationship with the U.S.

Trump will also tour Westminster Abbey while accompanied by Prince Andrew, where he will lay a wreath on the Grave of the Unknown Warrior.

On Tuesday, he will meet with Prime Minister May at St. James Palace over breakfast, with dinner being held later that day at the Winfield House.

RELATED: The Queen’s Not-So-Subtle Nod to Barack Obama You May Have Missed During Trump’s U.K. Visit

A news conference will be held later that day alongside May.

President Trump will join the Queen and Prince Charles at the Southsea Common in Portsmouth in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day. Trump will then travel to Ireland and meet with Varadkar.

While there they will stay at Trump’s hotel and golf resort in Ireland, then head to France the following day.

Speaking with reporters, an administration official declined to say whether the president might golf — a favorite activity — while at his Ireland resort.

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