No one from the Congresswoman's staff was at the Dearborn office when vandals smashed windows and property that belonged to beloved Democrat Rep. John Dingell
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Debbie Dingell
Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Police are investigating a break-in and vandalism at a Dearborn, Michigan, office that belongs to Rep. Debbie Dingell.

Dingell, 68, has used the office since 2014 when she was elected to serve in the House, representing the district her husband, Rep. John Dingell, held for a record-breaking 59 years.

Dingell's husband also used the office prior to his death in 2019 at 92. Some of the late congressman's belongings were damaged in the incident, which was reported on Monday, according to the AP.

"Our door and windows were smashed and memorabilia — especially John's items — was broken," Dingell, a Democrat, said in a statement. "Thankfully, my staff and I are safe and no one was hurt, but we must also recognize the impact attacks like this one and constant threats have had on my staff and all Congressional staff. This needs to stop now."

Although the office had been closed because of a fire in the building, Dingell told Detroit Free Press someone was there on Friday and didn't see any damage. She believes the break-in and ransacking occurred early Monday, she added.

Rep. John Dingell and Rep.-elect Debbie Dingell
Credit: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

U.S. Capitol police and local law enforcement are investigating the incident.

"We are working with them to identify who is responsible and hold them accountable for their actions," Dingell said in a statement.

Dingell also said her office has been receiving threats for months but the motive for the incident is unclear, the AP reports.

"What I can tell you is that the disrespect, violence, and division need to end in this country," Dingell added. "We need to practice civility and kindness, not divisiveness and anger."

Detroit Free Press reports that objects were removed from the office walls and smashed.

"This vandalization really hits home," Dingell said. "Regardless of if your views differ from mine or from your neighbor's, we need to learn to hear each other out and work together to solve the issues facing our nation. Violence and vandalism aren't the answer."