"President Clinton has continued to make excellent progress over the last 24 hours," a spokesperson shared on Saturday
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Former President Bill Clinton
| Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty

After four days in the hospital, Bill Clinton is on the mend.

A spokesperson for the former president, 75, announced that his condition has improved after he was hospitalized at the University of California Irvine Medical Center on Tuesday for a non-COVID related infection.

"President Clinton has continued to make excellent progress over the last 24 hours. He will remain overnight at UC Irvine Medical Center to continue to receive IV antibiotics before an expected discharge tomorrow," Clinton spokesperson Angel Ureña shared in a statement on Saturday.

Ureña continued, "He is in great spirits and has been spending time with family, catching up with friends, and watching football. He is deeply grateful for the excellent care he continues to receive and thankful to the many well-wishers who have sent kind words to him and his family. He's looking forward to getting home very soon."

This follows Friday's health update from Ureña, who shared that "all health indicators are trending in the right direction, including [Clinton's] white blood count which has decreased significantly."

Ureña added that Clinton was comforted by the "well wishes that people have sent from across America and around the world."

Clinton was in California to conduct Clinton Foundation business and was diagnosed with a urological infection earlier in the week, which morphed into a broader infection, a source previously told PEOPLE.

Bill Clinton
Credit: Alex Wong/getty

Earlier this week, his wife Hilary Clinton was seen visiting her husband's bedside. Photos and video of the former first lady showed her exiting UCI Medical Center late Thursday.

That same day, CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta appeared on Cuomo Prime Time. Gupta said he said he spoke to Clinton's team, who revealed "what they think is going on with the former president now is a blood infection, sometimes known as sepsis."