"Did we get your attention? Good"

By Ally Mauch
October 08, 2020 04:50 PM
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Get your booty – yes, that's right — to the poll: That's the message from a recent Atlanta voting PSA which takes an unusual approach to urging people to cast their ballots.

The video, which began gaining notice in September, features a group of strip club workers dancing to “Get Your Booty to the Poll” and giving information about voting and who appears up and down the ballot, including in little-known but influential local offices like school board members.

It was initially intended for an Atlanta audience but has since gone viral, garnering nearly 3 million views on Twitter.

“Did we get your attention? Good,” one of the dancers says in the video. “You know it’s more than just the president on the ballot right?” another adds.

“A district attorney decides who to prosecute, including whether or not to go after dirty cops. Do you know who elects the D.A.? We do,” they say. “But you don’t want to vote.”

The video also addresses abolishing the cash bail system, trades and coding being taught in school and criminal justice reform. “It's clear Black lives don’t matter to some of our current elected officials,” the dancers say. “If they matter to you, then don’t let other people decide who’s gonna run your community.”

Director Angela Barnes told NPR that she created the PSA to reach Black men, which is why she decided to set it around the Atlanta strip club scene.

"Atlanta has a strip club culture. People go out and go on dates at strip clubs, people get married and have funerals at strip clubs," Barnes said. "You know, people don't go there just to see, like, naked people. You go there for the vibe."

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According to The Pew Research Center, 54 percent of eligible Black men said they had voted in the 2016 election, while 64 percent of eligible Black women reported the same.

The gender gap among Black Americans is larger than that with white, Hispanic and Asian voters.

“We kind of determine what is hot and what’s not,” one of the dancers in the PSA, Coy Malone, told BuzzFeed News.

“A lot of the stuff that you see has been influenced by strip club culture, and especially Atlanta strip club culture,” she added. “If you’ve heard a song that is very popular on the radio or is very hot, nine times out of 10 we’ve heard it in the strip club like six months before everyone else. If we like it, everybody else likes it.”