The young calf was alone for six days outside of Anchorage, Alaska after his mother was involved in a fatal incident with a human

By Eric Todisco
July 14, 2020 02:29 PM
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Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is preparing for the arrival of a special new resident.

An 8-week-old male moose, who has yet to be named, is set to arrive at the CMZoo's Rocky Mountain Wild exhibit, located in Colorado Spring, Co., after spending about six days orphaned outside of Anchorage, Alaska.

The long-legged calf, who has big eyes and light brown hair, was left alone after his mother was involved in a fatal incident with a human. He has since been in the care of the Alaska Zoo.

The calf's arrival comes less than two months after the CMZoo's beloved 12-year-old Canada moose, Tahoma, died.

"People have seen an increase in activity in the moose yard over the past several days, as we prep for the calf's arrival," said Rebecca Zwicker, animal care manager at Rocky Mountain Wild. "Our guests have been really curious about the updates we're making in the moose yard, so we're excited to share this announcement."

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

The CMZoo said that two of its staff members are en route to the Alaska Zoo to pick up the calf and transport him home. Beginning on Tuesday, updates on the team's journey home with the calf can be followed on the CMZoo's Facebook and YouTube channels.

"We knew we wanted to continue Tahoma's incredible legacy with another moose, but we didn't know how it would happen so quickly," said Courtney Rogers, a lead animal keeper at Rocky Mountain Wild. "It's a bittersweet situation, because of course, we wish this young calf could have continued living in the wild. But, since that was not possible, we're grateful we'll be able to care for him here."

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Once the calf arrives at the CMZoo, he will move into the Rocky Mountain Wild's moose yard, which the staff has "baby proofed" ahead of the moose's arrival.

The CMZoo is one of only eight Association of Zoos and Aquariums-accredited institutions in the U.S. to house moose. Since moose are rarely in human care, CMZoo pioneered moose care practices through their work with Tahoma.