The bill has now moved on to the assembly where it will be debated

By Kelli Bender
Updated July 08, 2016 06:56 PM
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Credit: Lacuna/Getty

New Jersey took a big step towards ending puppy mills.

According to Country Living, the state’s senate approved a bill this week that would require all pet stores licensed after January 12, 2016 to only sell cats and dogs brought in from shelters. Since many puppy mill dogs go on to be sold at pet stores, this legislation is an important start to shutting down the cruel businesses for good.

The bill, which was introduced by Senator Raymond Lesniak, has now moved on to the assembly where it will be debated.

“These puppy mills have gained a notorious reputation for putting profits ahead of the humane treatment of dogs and cats,” Senator Lesniak said. “Their mass breeding has created inbred health and behavioral problems and the inhumane conditions have left too many of these pets to suffer from neglect and mistreatment.”

The bill, a revision of the New Jersey Pet Protection Act, passed by a vote of 27-8. Many of those who voted against the change, believe the revision would hurt future pet stores trying to open and would limit the selection of animals available to the public.