The population of crowned lemurs is quickly shrinking due to habitat destruction and poaching

By Eric Todisco
July 05, 2019 10:00 AM
Newquay Zoo

It’s a baby lemur! Newquay Zoo in England recently welcomed the arrival of a crowned lemur, an endangered species that is continuing to decrease in population.

In a press release, the zoo announced the birth of the crowned baby lemur that was born to mom Beloha and dad Xavier on May 23.

“We are thrilled to welcome this cute bundle of joy as it is a great effort towards the conservation of this endangered species,” said animal curator John Meek.

The last time the zoo bred crowned lemurs was in 2016, according to the press release.

“The population of crowned lemurs is dwindling due to habitat loss and poaching,” Meek added. “This, paired with the fact that they are native to only Northern Madagascar, means that there is a real possibility that the species could become extinct in the wild. So it’s become extremely important for zoos to hold this species.”

Crowned Lemur
courtesy Newquay Zoo

 

Crowned Lemur
courtesy Newquay Zoo

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As of now, the baby lemur is unsexed, and is being closely protected by mother Beloha. As a crowned lemur reaches adulthood, their sex becomes identifiable. Females tend to be predominantly gray, while males turn reddish brown.

Both genders have an orange crown pattern on the top of their head, which is why they are called “crowned” lemurs.

Crowned Lemur
Newquay Zoo
Crowned Lemur
Newquay Zoo

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Visitors to Newquay Zoo — which first opened in 1969 — can find the little newborn and its mother in the trees of the Madagascan Walkthrough exhibit.

According to Animal Diversity, crowned lemurs are typically the size of a small house cat, with a body length of 34 cm.

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