President Donald Trump’s eldest son was granted a permit to hunt grizzlies in Alaska’s Seward Peninsula

By Maria Pasquini
February 24, 2020 02:35 PM
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Donald Trump Jr.
| Credit: Lou Rocco/ABC

Donald Trump Jr. has been awarded a non-resident permit to hunt grizzly bears in northwestern Alaska.

On Friday, President Donald Trump’s eldest son, 42, was granted one of 27 permits to hunt grizzlies in Alaska’s Seward Peninsula, which are given out by the state on a periodic basis and chosen via lottery, according to Reuters.

Typically, there are “thousands of applications,” this time around, there were not, Eddie Grasser, the wildlife conservation director for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, told Reuters.

23 of the spots went unclaimed, according to Grasser, who added that Don Jr. will have to pay a non-resident tag fee of $1,000 and buy a $160 non-resident license.

Don Jr., who has long defended his love of hunting, was also at the center of a recent safari auction.

Earlier this month, the Safari Club International held an online auction for a seven-day “dream hunt” in Alaska with Don Jr.

“This year we will be featuring Donald Trump Jr., a man who needs no introduction, and who’s passion for the outdoors makes him the number one ambassador for our way of life,” read the description for the trip, which ended up going for $150,000.

Donald Trump Jr.
| Credit: Paul Sancya/AP/Shutterstock

“Anyone who thinks hunters are just ‘bloodthirsty morons’ hasn’t looked into hunting,” Don Jr. told Forbes in 2012. “If you wait through long, cold hours in the November woods with a bow in your hands hoping a buck will show or if you spend days walking in the African bush trailing Cape buffalo while listening to lions roar, you’re sure to learn hunting isn’t about killing.”

In 2018, the Trump administration lifted a ban on importing elephant trophies, although the president had previously called elephant hunting a “horror show.”

His administration has also proposed rolling back a ban of baiting Alaskan grizzly bears on federal land.