Kyle Lanzer/Cleveland Metroparks

The giraffe calf, who was born slightly underweight, is said to be bonding well with his mom Jada

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April 30, 2019 03:23 PM

Derek Zoolander has “Blue Steel,” and this unnamed giraffe calf has a supermodel stare we’re going to call “The Tall Order.”

According to the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo , this studly little guy was born on April 15. The Ohio zoo recently introduced the baby to the world, and the calf was ready for his close-up.

The zoo shared two photos of the new arrival. One of the baby’s smoldering gaze and another of the calf’s softer side: a shot of him cuddling with his mom Jada.

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Both the calf and his mom are being closely monitor by zookeepers are said to be bonding well. The calf was born weighing approximately 101 pounds, which is on the small side for a male giraffe calf. The average weight for a male baby giraffe calf is 150 pounds.

Kyle Lanzer/Cleveland Metroparks

This smaller birth weight has not stopped the 6-ft. calf from nursing or walking around the giraffe barn. Jada and her new baby will stay in the barn, where they are occasionally visible to zoo guests, until they are ready to join the rest of the zoo’s Masai giraffe herd in the outdoor habitat.

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Other future plans include choosing a name for the handsome new zoo resident. The zoo says they will be announcing details on how the public can help name the calf in the coming weeks.

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According to Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, the facility cares for their giraffe herd and the giraffe herds out in the wild. The zoo’s Future for Wildlife Fund “helps protect giraffes by addressing poaching and illegal snaring, translocating animals to secure endangered populations, and also conducting studies on population and disease.” The current wild giraffe population has dropped by close to 40% in just 15 years, leaving less then 80,000 giraffes in the world.

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