100 Years of Famous Dogs

From the Wizard of Oz's Toto to the real Marley from Marley & Me, here's a look at some of our favorite history-making canines.

01 of 15

TOTO

Image
Everett

A little dog named Terry won over generations of fans when she starred in the 1939 film the Wizard of Oz as Toto. The loyal pup of Dorothy Gale (played by Judy Garland) was a Cairn terrier who appeared in a dozen films before passing away in 1944 around age 10.

02 of 15

UNO

UNO
Courtesy Westminster Kennel Club

A boisterous beagle nabbed the title of Best in Show at the Westminster Dog Show in 2008, the first of his breed to ever win the prize. With his happy personality and friendly yowl, Uno, who visited with the President and First Lady during his reign, made friends around the country.

03 of 15

9/11 RESCUE DOG TRAKR

9/11 RESCUE DOG TRAKR

Trakr and his human partner James Symington searched the rubble of the World Trade Center in 2001 and found the last survivor under 30 feet of debris. This past summer, the German shepherd was chosen by a California company to be cloned.

04 of 15

RIN TIN TIN

RIN TIN TIN
Everett

Corporal Lee Duncan rescued Rin Tin Tin when he was a puppy from a bombed out German kennel near the end of World War I in 1918 and took the dog home to California. When a producer spotted the dog jumping over 10 feet at a dog show, Rin Tin Tin went on to star in movies and radio adventures before he died in 1932.

05 of 15

GUS

Image
Justin Sullivan/Getty

This funny looking Chinese crested lost one eye to a cat and one leg to a tumor, which helped him win the title of World’s Ugliest Dog at the 20th annual competition in Petaluma Calif. in 2008. Sadly, Gus’ reign was short lived, he died on Nov. 10 at age nine.

06 of 15

TYSON

TYSON
Martin Grimes/Splash News Online

One of the earliest YouTube stars, this three-year-old bulldog skateboarded his way to fame in 2004. Videos of Tyson riding his board up and down the Venice, Calif. boardwalk earned him an appearance on Oprah and a spot in the Rose Bowl Parade.

07 of 15

MARLEY

Image
Courtesy John Grogan

John Grogan’s best-selling book about life with a misbehaving Lab named Marley stole the world’s heart in 2005. Marley’s mischievous spirit would live in on in the 2008 tearjerker Marley & Me starring Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson.

08 of 15

LASSIE

Image
Everett

The proud collie started as canine character in a short story set in England, then jumped to the big screen with 1943’s Lassie Come-Home. A male dog named Pal played the original Lassie, his descendants, trained by brothers Rudd Weatherwax and Frank Inn, starred in the American TV show.

09 of 15

BENJI

Image
Everett

Rescued from a shelter by Hollywood trainer Frank Inn, this little terrier mix called Higgins, appeared on Petticoat Junction then, at age 15, in his own movie in 1974. Higgins’ daughter later took over the role of the scrappy, emotive mutt.

10 of 15

CHECKERS

CHECKERS
AP

In the campaign for vice president in 1952 Richard Nixon used the American cocker spaniel, Checkers, to defect criticism for taking gifts. The Nixon kids loved the dog dearly, so, “we’re gonna keep it,” he famously said.

11 of 15

BUDDY

Image
Mary Evans Picture Library/Everett

Frank Morris, a blind Tennessee teenager, brought the first guide dog to the U.S. from Switzerland when he heard about their remarkable ability to be trained to help the visually impaired. In 1929, he established The Seeing Eye, America’s first guide dog school.

12 of 15

ASHLEY WHIPPET

Image
Courtesy Hyperflite

This athletic pooch leapt into stardom in 1974 at Dodgers Stadium by rushing the field with owner Alex Stein and leaping for Frisbees on live television. The dog’s popularity prompted Stein to start a national disc dog competition and spawned a new sport.

13 of 15

PETE

PETE
Everett

Pete the pup always saved the Little Rascals on the classic TV show Our Gang starting in 1922.The original pit bull had a ring around his eye, which was made darker with dye.

14 of 15

BALTO

BALTO
Hulton Archive/Getty

When diphtheria threatened Nome in 1925, sled dogs were the only hope to deliver serum. Balto, a Siberian Husky, led his team through blizzards and on double-duty to quell an outbreak. Frederick Roth sculpted this Central Park statue of the dog and his heroic journey is commemorated annually at the Iditarod sled dog race in Alaska.

15 of 15

SINBAD

Image
Bettmann/Corbis

This black and tan mutt became the Coast Guard’s mascot during WWII after he boarded the Cutter Campbell in 1937 and was adopted by the crew. Sinbad slept in a different sailor’s bunk every night and would notoriously drink with them on shore leave.

Who’s missing? Tell us your about your favorite historic dog here.

Related Articles