Tamera Mowry-Housley starred in the comedy series, which premiered in 1994, alongside her twin sister Tia Mowry-Hardrict

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Tamera Mowry-Housley
Tamera Mowry-Housley and her kids
| Credit: Tamera Mowry/ Instagram

Tamera Mowry-Housley's kids might follow in her showbiz footsteps!

The actress, 42, told E! News that her two children with husband Adam Housley, daughter Ariah Talea, 5, and son Aden John Tanner, 8, have been binge-watching her '90s sitcom Sister, Sister lately — and they feel inspired to pursue an acting career of their own.

"They love Sister, Sister," Mowry-Housley said. "Ariah watches it on her own. She loves it so much [and] Aden loves it so much that now both of them want to be actors."

"I was like, 'Oh lord. Oh lord,' " she joked of her reaction to their new career aspirations.

Mowry-Housley and her twin sister Tia Mowry-Hardrict starred together in Sister, Sister, which ran for six seasons between 1994 and 1999. The throwback comedy became available to stream on Netflix in September, reaching a new audience decades later.

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Sister SIster
Sister, Sister
| Credit: Walt Disney Television

Mowry-Housley — who shares daughter Cairo Tiahna, 2, and son Cree Taylor, 9, with husband Cory Hardrictspoke with PEOPLE in October, reflecting on Sister, Sister's legacy.

"I feel it's kind of surreal because in my mind I still remember it, like day one," she said. "I still remember the buzz and the excitement that Sister, Sister brought. [I can still remember] my first day of that table reading and me saying, 'That girl has my face!' I remember being on TGIF."

Now, two decades since the show first premiered in 1994, Mowry-Housley said it is amazing to see Sister, Sister inspire and entertain a whole new generation of viewers.

"To see the younger generation loving it just as much as our generation did, it's really cool to relive that moment," she said. "I think in a way [we're] experiencing why something becomes a classic."