"And my parents, I haven't seen them in a really long time, so we've been FaceTiming with the babies every day," she tells PEOPLE

By Mary Green and Benjamin VanHoose
December 21, 2020 05:45 PM
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Kristen Wiig says living in a "bubble" with her babies during lockdown has its pluses and minuses.

The actress, 47, and fiancé Avi Rothman welcomed twins via surrogate in January, and since the world entered quarantine quickly after their arrival due to the coronavirus pandemic, she's enjoyed ample quality time with the little ones at home. "I love that I can be with my family," Wiig tells PEOPLE in this week's issue.

Uninterrupted bonding time aside, the new mom admits that not being able to socialize the twins has been difficult.

"My babies aren't even walking yet," she says. "I want to be home with them, so that has been a positive for me, of course. But also they don't get to see anybody. I have really close friends that haven't seen my kids in a long time."

"And my parents, I haven't seen them in a really long time, so we've been FaceTiming with the babies every day," adds Wiig. "They're living in such a bubble, and that I can't have them interact and be social has been a little bit challenging."

Chatting alongside Wiig is her Wonder Woman 1984 costar Gal Gadot, who opens up about life in quarantine with her two daughters, Alma, 9, and Maya, 3½, whom she shares with husband Yaron Versano.

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gal gadot and kristen wiig
Credit: Jason Bell

"March to June I was so happy to be home and spend time with the family," says Gadot, 35. "I became Martha Stewart! I was cooking and I was trying to bake every day. And the amount of kitchen injuries that I have are insane. I literally chopped the tip of my finger off once."

Gadot adds that she's "grateful" for the family time, being sure not to take anything for granted.

"Having said that," she says, "when it started, my 9-year-old, she didn't figure out completely the whole remote learning thing and we became the cops: 'You have a class in five minutes. You need to get the link.' You need to make sure they do homework."

"Then my 3-year-old wants to be played with and wants to be entertained," continues Gadot. "But in the background of all this, you have this uncertainty of what exactly is going on."

For more from Kristen Wiig and Gal Gadot, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands Friday.