While guest-hosting The Ellen DeGeneres Show Monday, Katy Perry jokes about the similarities between being a mom and being a pop singer
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Katy Perry is already used to some aspects of new mom life.

While guest-hosting The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Monday, the American Idol judge talks about becoming a mother to baby daughter Daisy Dove, now 14 months, and jokes about how the experiences aren't too far off from the pop star lifestyle.

"Now that I'm a mom, my life is actually kinda totally different. And yet I realized it's kinda similar to being a pop star: You're up all night, usually holding a bottle of some kind, there's vomit on the floor," Perry, who turned 37 on Monday, says with a laugh, "and your boobs are always out."

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Katy Perry on Ellen
Credit: Michael Rozman/Warner Bros.

Last month, Perry, who shares her daughter with Orlando Bloom, told Variety about the changes becoming a mother brought on her life and how her baby taught her the true meaning of "unconditional love."

"As a new mom, those first six weeks are like, 'What?' It's just the biggest life change ever," she explained. "You're responsible for someone's well-being that can't even hold their head up. It's a real shift, and you become not No. 1 on the call sheet. And it's the best."

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Referring to images about motherhood projected by social media, she added: "Everything that's supposed to fade away, fades away, and a balance comes in. I like to live more in the real world for now."

"I never really truly knew about unconditional love. Obviously my mother has that for me, but I didn't really experience it in the first-person until I had my child," added Perry. "And that was just a whole 'nother level. I think I see through the eyes of a child — like my life and my art always feels playful — so it's amazing to be able to relate to kids even in your deep 30s."