"I am so incredibly grateful for the light, the love, the laughter, the purpose, the joy and the grace you have brought to my life!" writes Katherine Heigl

Advertisement
Katherine-Heigl
Credit: Katherine Heigl/Instagram

Adalaide Marie Hope is 5!

The middle child and younger daughter of actress and blogger Katherine Heigl and her musician husband Josh Kelley celebrated her big day Monday, posing for a selfie with her mom that the latter shared on Instagram alongside a sweet message.

“It is my sassy, fiery, break dancing, bug loving, whip smart, fiercely loyal, daddy’s girls’ birthday! HAPPY 5TH BIRTHDAY ADALAIDE MARIE HOPE KELLEY!” wrote Heigl, 38. “I am so incredibly grateful for the light, the love, the laughter, the purpose, the joy and the grace you have brought to my life!”

Continued the Grey’s Anatomy alum, “Thank God the world has a girl like you to show us how it’s done! #notthebabyanymore #littlethingsdontstaylittlelong.”

Want all the latest pregnancy and birth announcements, plus celebrity mom blogs? Click here to get those and more in the PEOPLE Babies newsletter.

Heigl and Kelley, 37, recently added to their Utah-based brood: Son Joshua Bishop was born on Dec. 20.

The Doubt star and her husband opened up to PEOPLE shortly after Joshua’s birth, with Heigl admitting that two adoptions and one childbirth experience may not be the end of her family-expansion plans.

“I still want more children,” she shared, adding that her way of achieving that is flexible. “I’d get pregnant again, and I still am very inspired by adoption. I also have been thinking a lot about fostering.”

FROM COINAGE: See Where 6 Stars Were Before They Were Famous

But for now, spending time with Kelley, little Joshua and their two girls (daughter Naleigh, whom the couple adopted from Korea in 2009, is 8) — including giving them unconditional love and support — is what life is all about.

“We’re there to support them as parents do. It’s all about open communication and helping them access whatever they need to feel absolutely 100 percent secure in who they are,” Heigl told PEOPLE in January. “Whether that’s about their history, their heritage, their race, their memories … we’re there.”