Jack Osbourne's mom Sharon Osbourne previously revealed that his 2½-year-old daughter Minnie had contracted COVID-19

By Jen Juneau and Anya Leon
September 23, 2020 02:50 PM
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Jack Osbourne is giving some details about how not one but two of his daughters contracted COVID-19.

On Wednesday's episode of the Pretty Messed Up podcast, the father of three said that both 2½-year-old Minnie Theodora and one of her older sisters (Osbourne also shares Andy Rose, 5, and Pearl Clementine, 8, with ex-wife Lisa Stelly) had come down with the virus after drinking from a drink of someone who had traveled.

"Someone who works for me went away, came back — and they didn't tell me they were going out of town, they just appeared and were like, 'Oh, yeah, we went out [of town].' And my daughter picked up the drink that they set down and took a sip," said Jack, 34.

Minnie is staying with her dad at the moment while her sister, who also has the virus, is currently with their mom. And the toddler is doing much better now but only ever had mild symptoms to begin with, Jack told AJ McLean and Cheryl Burke on their podcast.

Jack Osbourne and family
Jack Osbourne/Instagram

"The only symptoms my daughter had was just a little bit of a runny nose and a fever, and that was for, like, three days," he said. "She's got zero symptoms now; she's still technically in the positive window because it hasn't been two weeks. It's just a lot of dodging and weaving — we spend a lot of time outdoors."

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"I'm to that point where I was like, 'When is this gonna lift? My house has had a COVID outbreak,' " he also said.

Jack's mother Sharon Osbourne revealed Minnie's diagnosis during Monday's season 11 premiere of The Talk, explaining that it meant she was unable to appear live in-studio as originally planned.

"She's okay, she's doing good," Sharon, 67, shared of Minnie's condition. "I don't have it. Her daddy doesn't have it. Her mommy doesn't have it. Her sisters don't."

Saying that Minnie got the illness "from somebody who works for my son," Sharon added that Minnie testing positive for coronavirus "just goes to show you ... that children can get COVID."

Jack Osborne and daughter Minnie
Jack Osbourne/instagram. inset:getty imagews

While Sharon, who has repeatedly tested negative for coronavirus, admitted that she wanted to see co-hosts Sheryl UnderwoodEve and Carrie Ann Inaba "so bad," she said she only has "one more week left of quarantining."

RELATED VIDEO: Sharon and Kelly Osbourne Talk About Online Shopping, Life in Quarantine and Watching the MTV

As for Jack, he gets "tested every two days" and is able to be with Minnie. They have N95 respirator masks that they use and are "constantly washing up," he said on the podcast.

"I was at my neurologist recently asking these questions and they [said] the kind of autoimmune disease I have isn't like someone with diabetes — it's a bit different," said the star, who has multiple sclerosis. "What they don't know is if you get COVID and it totally rocks you, they think it would make you more susceptible to an MS flareup."

"We were with my mom on Sunday when I found out [the girls] had been exposed," Jack added. "Luckily my mom's all good — she's been quarantined and getting tested every three days. My mom is staying somewhere else [away from my dad, Ozzy Osbourne]."

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