"At least I don’t have to feel a sense of missing out," the actress, who welcomed a son in April, jokes about caring for a newborn while in quarantine

By Benjamin VanHoose
December 14, 2020 12:39 PM
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Felicity Jones is reflecting on becoming a mom in the middle of a pandemic.

The Oscar nominee, 37, welcomed her first child, a son, with director husband Charles Guard in April. Speaking with The Times recently, Jones recalled to the U.K. outlet how intimidating it was to prepare for having a baby during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. "To have a baby in an apocalyptic moment is pretty scary," she says.

"My husband and I have been calling it 'double lockdown.' You’re pretty much removed from the world anyway in those first few months. And at least I don’t have to feel a sense of missing out," she says of caring for her newborn while in isolation.

Jones also explains how she's adapted to life as a new mom, eight months after her baby boy's arrival.

"Parenting is just a rollercoaster of fatigue," she says, "celebrating that you have got through each day at about 7:05 p.m., and then realizing you have to live your entire life between the hours of 7 and 10:30!"

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Credit: Dia Dipasupil/Getty

Jones stars in the new Netflix space film The Midnight Sky, which she filmed while pregnant. The star said director George Clooney was one of the people she told first — and he reworked the film's story to incorporate her pregnancy.

"I think I might have told George Clooney that I was pregnant before I told some of my friends and family. But George was very determined to keep me in the film, and the more we explored it, the more it felt right to include the pregnancy as part of the story," she says. "It was really nice that I could play what was happening to me personally as well as playing the character."

"George was very modern in his approach and actually quite revolutionary in not wanting to hide it," she says. "In the end it was a much cooler way of navigating the story."