Chris Pietroforte, a former firefighter and EMT of 19 years, now owns a company called Central Valley CPR in Tulare, California

By Robyn Merrett
March 07, 2019 10:35 PM
AP

California CPR instructor Chris Pietroforte taught his toddler how to perform CPR to prove that a person of any age can save a life.

Pietroforte recently shared a moving video of his then-2-year-old daughter Saige practicing the life-saving technique on a test-dummy.

“If this beautiful 2 year old can learn CPR/AED, what’s stopping you?” Pietroforte captioned the post of his now-3-year-old.

In the clip, little Saige can be seen giving rescue breaths and chest compressions all on her own.

Over the years, CPR instructors have taught trainees to perform compressions to the beat of “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees because the song has at least 100 beats per minute — the same rate the American Heart Association recommends for chest compressions.

However, thanks to Pietroforte a new song can be used during CPR training, and it’s the popular children’s song “Baby Shark.”

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“Any song that’s between 100 to 120 bpm, you can do it to,” Pietroforte told Inside Edition, explaining a child can sing a song they’d know, which can help them remember the technique easier.

After working as a firefighter and an EMT for 19 years, Pietroforte opened up Central Valley CPR — his own CPR practice in Tulare, California where his baby girl is a big help.

“She actually goes to all my classes when I teach and she demonstrates how to do it,” Pietroforte told the outlet.

“So she’s in there and I tell people that if they can’t outdo her, they won’t pass, and that’s actually happened a couple times. I had someone drop out of an EMT class because she outdid him and he was embarrassed and he left because he didn’t wanna be outdone by a 2-year-old.”

RELATED: 21-Year-Old Arizona Man Who Learned CPR from The Office Saves Woman’s Life

“My goal is to get as many people out there trained. The more people trained, the better it is out there for society,” Pietroforte told Inside Edition.

According to CPR Certification HQ, “More than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States per year, out of which 70% happen inside homes.”

“Effective CPR provided by a bystander in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest can increase the chances of survival by 2x or 3x.”

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