Emmy Rossum says she got vaccinated against COVID-19 while pregnant, and "just learned our daughter now has antibodies"

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Emmy Rossum Instagram
Emmy Rossum and her daughter
| Credit: Emmy Rossum Instagram

Emmy Rossum is introducing her baby girl to the world — and encouraging those who can safely get the COVID-19 vaccine to do so.

On Sunday, the Shameless alum, 34, shared the first photo of her daughter with husband Sam Esmail. In the sweet image, a casually dressed Rossum is kissing her baby (whose face is turned away from the camera) on the head.

"When I was pregnant I got vaccinated," the actress wrote alongside her post. "Not only did we have a healthy, beautiful baby girl but we also just learned our daughter now has antibodies."

"In short, stop being an irresponsible idiot and get the vaccine," Rossum concluded her caption, which Esmail, 43, also shared on Twitter.

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Rossum announced in May that she and her Mr. Robot creator husband, 43, had welcomed their first child together, after previously keeping her pregnancy under wraps.

The Phantom of the Opera star shared the happy news alongside two black-and-white maternity photos. One shot showed Rossum baring her baby bump, while another featured Esmail cradling her belly.

"5.24.21," Rossum captioned the post. "On a sunny Monday morning, at 8:13AM, we welcomed our daughter into the world."

The new mom also posted a picture of what appeared to be her newborn's footprint.

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Back in April, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky spoke during a White House COVID-19 briefing and cited a recent study that suggests there is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine causes any form of concern for pregnant individuals or their babies.

The study, which was published in The New England Journal of Medicine and updated in June, reported data from over 35,000 individuals who were either pregnant or soon to become pregnant.

After getting the vaccine, the individuals stated that they had typical side effects associated with a vaccine, such as pain at the injection site, but the report said that the data "did not show obvious safety signals."

"Importantly, no safety concerns were observed for people vaccinated in the third trimester or safety concerns for their babies. As such, the CDC recommends that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine," said Walensky. "We know that this is a deeply personal decision, and I encourage people to talk to their doctors and their primary care providers to determine what is best for them and for their baby."

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