"My kids are fantastic, they are so much fun," he says, adding in jest, "which is not to say they're not terrible as well"

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Dax Shepard is going to great lengths to hide some valuables from his kids.

The Buddy Games actor, 46, appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show Tuesday, when he shared that he purchased a safe in order to lock up some items that his children often find a way to take and hide. Shepard shares daughters Lincoln, 7, and Delta, 6, with wife Kristen Bell.

"My kids are fantastic, they are so much fun," Shepard begins, offering an update on their quarantine life. "I know that there's been so much heartache and loss and disappointment and all this for so many people, but for us, you know, I just got to see them so much, which I'm so grateful for."

"Which is not to say they're not terrible as well," he then jokes. "They are ferrets, they steal everything I have and have been doing so for 7 and a half years. I can't have a pair of tweezers, I can't have nail-clippers — they'll get stolen within 30 minutes, then they go somewhere I don't know. Maybe when we move I'll discover where these things are."

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Dax Shepard on Ellen
Credit: Warner Bros.
Dax Shepard on Ellen
Credit: Warner Bros.

The comedian says he "recently invested in a safe," and Bell, 40, thought he was joking until the safe arrived and he stowed it away. "It's not a joke because that stuff adds up. I also cut hair semiprofessionally and those scissors are like $100 a pop. I've gone through a dozen pairs of those," he says. "So I finally got a $100 safe in hopes of saving a couple thousand bucks."

Shepard explains that he put the key "up high above the mirror" so no one could reach it since he "is the only one above 5 feet in the house." His methods still didn't thwart his sneaky girls.

"Lo and behold, got a chair pulled up," he recalls. "There was a chair pulled up, went to get the key and it's not there, open the drawer, the safe's open — scissors are gone."

"But now I'm gonna get a combination safe for the key. I got it figured out," concludes Shepard.