In an interview with Zane Lowe, Taylor Swift reflected on how her early dating life was portrayed online

By Benjamin VanHoose
October 30, 2019 01:55 PM

Taylor Swift has a new perspective on the sexism she faced growing up in the music business.

In a Beats 1 interview with host Zane Lowe last week, the “Lover” singer, 29, opened up about the “unfair” depiction of female artists in the industry, particularly when it comes to their private relationships.

Swift — who released her first album in 2006 at age 16 — said coverage of her personal life and purported breakup lyrics were used, from her point of view, to diminish her songwriting talents.

“When I was, like, 23 and people were just kind of reducing me to … kind of making slideshows of my dating life and putting people in there that I’d sat next to at a party once and deciding that my songwriting was like a trick rather than a skill and a craft,” she said.

Swift added: “In a way, it’s figuring out how to completely minimize that skill by taking something that everyone in their darkest, darkest moments loves to do, which is just to slut-shame, you know? That happened to me at a very young age, so that was a bit hard. That was one of the first times I was like, ‘Wow, this is not fair.'”

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Taylor Swift in 2012
Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Now, according to Forbes, the highest-paid celebrity in the world, Swift has developed a refreshed way of looking at herself and the struggles women face.

“I don’t think people understand how easy it is to infer that someone who’s a female artist or a female in our industry is somehow doing something wrong by wanting love, wanting money, wanting success,” Swift said. “Women are not allowed to want those things the way that men are allowed to want them.”

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Swift said she’s thankful for the #MeToo” movement and a society that’s undergoing an introspection on its internalized misogyny.

“I think when I was the youngest, it was hard because I didn’t understand why nobody was saying that this was wrong,” Swift said, adding, “We have made incredible progress. We’ve made incredible strides and I can look back at those lessons I learned when I was younger and I really truly don’t think I did anything wrong by having a normal dating life in my early 20s.”

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