“I'm just going to assume that I did because everything I've read completely pointed to that," Sam Smith said

By Maria Pasquini
April 16, 2020 02:30 PM
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Although Sam Smith never got tested for coronavirus, both the Grammy-winning singer and their sister began exhibiting symptoms of the virus while living together.

“I didn’t get tested but I know I have it,” Smith, 27 said of their self-diagnosis while speaking with Zane Lowe via FaceTime on Apple Music. “I’m just going to assume that I did because everything I’ve read completely pointed to that. So yeah, I think I definitely had it.”

The “How Do You Sleep?” singer, whose symptoms started before the U.K. began to be significantly impacted by the virus, shared that within a week, their sister “started getting the same symptoms.”

In order to ensure the safety of their family, the pair decided to self-isolate for three weeks. “I’ve got an older Nan, so we didn’t want to risk anything,” Smith said.

Sam Smith
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Fortunately, Smith is now on the mend.

“As everyone was kind of really on lock down, that’s when I got over it, luckily,” the singer said, before opening up about the effect the illness had on their feelings about singing.

“The first two weeks I was like, “I just want to sing. I don’t want to sing my songs, I don’t want to sing and film it, I just want to walk around the house and sing,’ ” Smith said. “I started sitting in my living room singing along to backing tracks of old Corinne Bailey Rae tunes. All these songs I used to just love singing. Old Stevie [Wonder] songs. And yeah, it just felt really good. But then I lost that a week later. I didn’t want to sing.”

Smith went on to address the decision to delay their forthcoming studio album, as well as the decision to rename the record.

“This whole last two years for me has been two years of transitioning. I’m used to this feeling of trying different stuff,” Smith explained, noting that now “the tone of the song To Die For in the title didn’t feel right.”

“I have an album ready to go whenever this all calms down or whenever it feels right. There’s a whole record there to go,” they said, without giving any hints about the release’s new name.

Sam Smith
Alexandre Schneider/Getty Images

However, while Smith has decided on a new title for the release which is “actually better than To Die For, the track list hasn’t been finalized. “I don’t even know if I’m going to put “Dancing with a Stranger” on there. And “How Do You Sleep” and “To Die For.” I think might take them off and do something completely fresh and it’ll be a completely new album,” Smith said, noting that while they “love” those singles, some of them have been out for quite some time now.

Slipping in a bit of extra good news for fans, the singer revealed that although their third album has yet to be released, album No. 4 is already in the works.

“I started writing and it’s a whole different vibe,” they said. “It’s amazing. It’s great.”

Smith first revealed the decision to postpone the release last month, which was scheduled to drop on May 1.

“I have done a lot of thinking the last few weeks and feel that the title of my album and imminent release doesn’t feel right, so I have come to the decision to continue working on the album and make some important changes and additions,” Smith wrote in a lengthy Instagram message addressed to their fans.

“I will be renaming my album and pushing back the release date — both of which are to be confirmed at this time. Don’t worry though, there will be an album this year, I promise! But until then I am still going to bring out some new music over the next few months, which I’m incredibly excited about,” Smith continued. “Thank you for always being by my side and for your understanding and patience. I always want to do right by you. Always.”

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