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October 26, 2017 02:05 PM

Prince’s death in 2016 left his sister Tyka Nelson heartbroken but not exactly surprised. In a new interview on the U.K. chat show Lorraine, the superstar’s sibling claims that she predicted Prince’s death more than three years before the prescription opioid overdose that took his life.

While speaking to the show’s host, Nelson recalled a conversation that left her shaken for years to come. “I was at McDonald’s and I got a phone call from an unknown number,” she says. To her surprise, she heard her famous brother on the other end of the line.

“He said, ‘Is this Tyka? It’s Prince here’, and I said, ‘After all this time I know your voice, I know who you are.”

As they spoke, he said something that haunts her to this day. “We were just walking and talking and he said, ‘I think I’ve done everything I’ve come to do.'” remembered Nelson, who took it as a sign that Prince felt his work was done. “That was him telling me it was time.”

Nelson — who told a similar story on ABC earlier this year — was so struck by the message that she mentally started making notes to prepare for his passing.

“I thought, ‘I’m going to buy earrings for his funeral, I’m buying a necklace for his funeral and I’m planning this, I’m telling all my relatives Prince is passing.’ So it took an actual three years from the time I got the call at McDonald’s…when I got the call that he had passed, I knew immediately what they meant because I was just kind of waiting for that day.”

She added that psychic powers might be in her family heritage. “I don’t know if it’s Native American history — we do sense things as a people.”

Nelson, who appeared on the show to promote the upcoming My Name Is Prince exhibition at London’s O2 Arena, also admitted that the loss of her brother drove her back into dangerous habits. The 57-year-old had struggled with an addiction to crack cocaine in the wake of her parents’ death years earlier, but Prince had supported her trip to get clean in a rehab facility.

Now with Prince’s passing, she risked a relapse. “I had the hardest time [out of all her siblings]. We had spent all of our lives together. It probably only hit me last October.” she says. “This is the first time I’ve not used drugs and alcohol to mask the pain of grief. This is the first time what I’m feeling has come out in music, not drugs and alcohol.”

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