"I feel like we're in a time in music where women — and Black women — are really on top, which is something I feel like we haven't seen in a very, very long time," she told Teen Vogue

By Tomás Mier
October 06, 2020 02:50 PM
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Normani for Teen Vogue
| Credit: Micaiah Carter for Teen Vogue

Normani knows her "Motivation:" representing Black girls in media.

In a cover story interview with Teen Vogue, the Savage x Fenty model and rising music star talked about making new music a solo artist and how she hopes to "change lives" with her artistry.

"Honestly, for me, it's bigger than the music," the 24-year-old told the outlet. "As much as I love what I do, I want to change lives and I want to reach as many people as I can."

"I feel like that's the difference between doing something that you love and also having purpose," she added. "I want to tell our stories and, like I said, be a representation that Black girls can do anything... I feel like it's my calling."

Normani
| Credit: Micaiah Carter for Teen Vogue
Normani
| Credit: Micaiah Carter for Teen Vogue

While the Fifth Harmony alum admitted that she sometimes feels "heart, sad [and] elated," she said she wants people to see that she is human too.

"Representation, like I always say, is key," she said. "To be a young woman that looks like myself, I just feel like [being a positive example] is a part of my legacy."

"It's me wanting to create better opportunities for us, and also just for people who think that they got us figured out," the "Love Lies" singer added. "[I want to show that] we are multifaceted and capable of much more than we get credit for, in the music industry and also in society. I feel like I have a duty."

And part of that representation came recently when she made a cameo on Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's "WAP" music video, something she was "really excited to be a part of."

RELATED: Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's Sexy 'WAP' Music Video Includes a Kylie Jenner Cameo

Normani for Teen Vogue
| Credit: Micaiah Carter for Teen Vogue

"I feel like we're in a time in music where women — and Black women — are really on top, which is something I feel like we haven't seen in a very, very long time," she said. "Where I come from, we were all about female empowerment. The fact that I could be a part of such a special moment embracing our sexuality, in which I definitely think there's a double standard, [was exciting] to be a part of it."

Normani has yet to release music on her own since dropping "Motivation" — and its iconic music video — last August. However, she said new music is on the way.

"There's so much expectation that I have for myself, so adding [fans' expectations] onto that can be a lot, but it really does motivate me," she said. (Pun intended?) "I really want to create a body of work that's going to count, you know? I'm never going to get my first album back."

As for when she'll drop her debut LP, she has a simple answer: "I'm close. When God tells me that it's done, then it'll be done. I'll feel it, you know?"