"I didn't tell that many people what had happened to me because so many people saw it happening and didn't care," Sarah McNeilly, who accused the singer of abuse, told Rolling Stone
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Marilyn Manson
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A new investigation into Marilyn Manson is shedding more light on the rock singer's allegedly dark behavior behind the scenes.

On Sunday, Rolling Stone published a thorough investigation — featuring interviews with 55 sources — sharing new allegations and details about the shock rocker, who has been accused by numerous women of sexual abuse, and his conduct with his former partners and employees.

Several friends of Manson, 52, told the magazine that the "Beautiful People" singer would share a video of himself receiving oral sex with new friends.

"Brian popped in a compilation tape of every girl he had ever taken into his closet for a blowjob," Russell Vaughn, who once hung out with Manson, told the outlet. (Two other people confirmed having seen the video.) "He was proud of it."

Another source shared with the magazine that the singer had an affinity for talking about forced sex, even naming his 2008 world tour, the Rape of the World Tour.

Marilyn Manson
Marilyn Manson
| Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty

"He would joke about rape all the time," a source told the outlet. "He loved the idea of rape — talking about rape, seeing it in the movies."

Actress Esmé Bianco, one of the women who's accused him of sexual abuse and sex trafficking, echoed that sentiment, telling the magazine that he "talked about raping me."

"[I thought], 'I guess that's just how he rolls and everyone is cool with it, so who am I to not laugh along?'" she told the outlet.

The report also referred to his 1998 memoir, where he wrote about a prank when he told a woman, "We're going to rape you in the parking lot and then crush you underneath your own car." And at a 2009 concert, according to Rolling Stone, he told the crowd, "When you laugh after you f— her, it is not rape."

Along with interviewing Bianco, Ashley Walters and Ashley Morgan Smithline — all who have active lawsuits against the singer detailing sexual, psychological and physical abuse — the article features a first-time interview with Sarah McNeilly who accused Manson of abuse last February, but had yet to speak out in an interview.

"He has a way of getting in your brain," McNeilly told the outlet. "I didn't tell that many people what had happened to me, because so many people saw it happening and didn't care."

Several of the people interviewed in Rolling Stone echoed McNeilly's sentiment, while others shared that they feared retaliation. ("People like me turned a blind eye," a former assistant of Manson's told the Los Angeles Times earlier this month.)

RELATED VIDEO: Marilyn Manson's Ex Ashley Morgan Smithline 'Thought He Was Going to Kill' Her During Abusive Relationship

McNeilly told Rolling Stone that speaking up about the abuse she allegedly faced at his hands was "the most terrifying thing I've ever done."

"I've been afraid for 10 years," she says. "Some of these girls who came out and it happened to them five years ago, God bless them. Because five years after [our relationship ended], I was a shell of a person. He took everything from me and then spit me out."

She added, "I don't know what kind of pain he's in. But he just wants to make people feel that pain over and over again."

In a statement to Rolling Stone from his attorney Howard King, Manson "vehemently denies any and all claims of sexual assault or abuse of anyone." And like in previous statements, he described the allegations as a "part of a coordinated attack by former partners and associates of Mr. Warner who have weaponized the otherwise mundane details of his personal life and their consensual relationships."

A spokesperson for Manson did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment regarding the Rolling Stone piece.

The story also further details allegations regarding the "Bad Girls' Room," a clear, soundproof enclosure that Smithline opened up to PEOPLE about in a cover story interview earlier this year.

"If I had to pee while he was replaying one of his songs I'd heard 30,000 times, I'd have to be locked in the box," she said then. "I was malnourished and cold."

To the Rolling Stone, a former assistant of Manson said "it was common knowledge" that "everybody had called" the enclosure the Bad Girls' Room.

evan rachel wood ashley lindsey smithline and esme bianco
Credit: Neilson Barnard/Getty; Jana Cruder; Marion Curtis/Shutterstock

"Even if I was screaming, no one would hear me," Smithline told the Rolling Stone. "First you fight, and he enjoys the struggle. I learned to not fight it because that was giving him what he wanted. I just went somewhere else in my head."

The story also detailed the physical and verbal abuse that Manson allegedly perpetrated on his employees.

"One time in Vegas, he had this prop mirror," a source told Rolling Stone about an instance in 2012. "It didn't work the way he wanted it to, and he took the microphone stand that weighed 60, 70 pounds, and he tried to smash through it. The stage manager was standing behind it, and it knocked him out; he had to go to the hospital."

Multiple sources also told the magazine that he was a "master of cult-like mind-control techniques" and would make his employees or friends monitor each other and report back, according to Rolling Stone.

"You couldn't trust anyone," the source said.

The new investigation — which follows a similar piece in the L.A. Times earlier this month — comes as Manson has become the center of new headlines due to his relationship with Kanye West.

The singer is featured on West's album Donda, he appeared at a listening party of the LP in August and most recently posed alongside Justin Bieber and West during a Sunday Service event on Halloween.

"It's heartbreaking. It makes me sick," Smithline told PEOPLE about seeing Manson at the Sunday Service event. "How is this the world we live in?"

A spokesperson for Manson explained to PEOPLE that Manson was an "integral part" of the Sunday Service. When asked if Manson had turned to Christianity, the spokesperson said, "That's nobody's business."

If you or someone you know has been a victim of sexual abuse, text "STRENGTH" to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 connected to a certified crisis counselor.

If you are experiencing domestic violence, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233, or go to thehotline.org. All calls are toll-free and confidential. The hotline is available 24/7 in more than 170 languages.