"There was a whole decade, if I am being completely honest, a decade, where it was like the elephant in the room," the songstress said

By Nicholas Rice
July 15, 2020 11:01 AM
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Kelly Rowland knows a thing or two about what it's like to be constantly compared to someone else.

The "Motivation" songstress, 39, opened up about her time in Destiny's Child and how she felt about being regularly compared to Beyoncé during the latest episode of The Voice Australia.

While mentoring contestant Chris Sebastian, who admitted to feeling overshadowed by his older brother, the former girl group member empathized with his situation and shared, "I know this feeling. Can you imagine what it’s like being in a group with Beyoncé?"

Recounting her own experiences, Rowland shared, "I would just torture myself in my head. Like, I can’t wear this dress because they’re going to say it’s like B. Or, I can’t have a song like that because it sounds too much like B. They’re gonna compare anyways."

Credit: Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Rowland continued on to say that the feeling of being compared haunted her for "a whole decade," adding, "I would be lying if I said no, it’s never bothered me. That’s bull."

"There was a whole decade, if I am being completely honest, a decade, where it was like the elephant in the room. It was the thing that would constantly be on my shoulder."

But despite the comparisons to Beyoncé, Rowland has found success as a solo artist in her own right after she began performing alongside the "Formation" singer in the famous girl group back in 1997.

The singer has released four studio albums — including 2002's Simply Deep, 2007's Ms. Kelly, 2011's Here I Am and 2013's Talk a Good Game — and most recently released her new single, "Coffee," back in April.

Rowland previously opened up to PEOPLE about her latest solo venture and about all of the lessons she's learned throughout her life's journey.

RELATED VIDEO: Exclusive: Go Behind the Scenes of Kelly Rowland's New Music Video

Appearing semi-nude in her latest music video, Rowland detailed the meaning behind it and the song's steamy lyrics.

“It’s really about just owning your sexuality. You should already know how sexy and great you are without someone having to tell you," she said. "As women, for so long we'd do something to be regarded by others, and this song says, 'I really don’t need to hear what anyone else has to say.'"

And with the song's visuals, Rowland noted that she highlighted "the different tones and textures and colors of beauty that there are, and how rich that is, and how unified we are as women."

She added, "That really meant a lot to me. You see, I’m just one person, but I’m even better with other women next to me."