"Vivian told Jamie he'll need a different litigator and that she and H&K weren't interested in that role — so Jamie authorized Vivian to help him find a strong litigator, which she did," says a source about Jamie's former lawyer Vivian Thoreen

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Britney Spears' father Jamie has hired a new attorney as he gears up for a potential investigation into his 13-year role as his daughter's conservator.

After Jamie, 69, was suspended as the conservator of his daughter's estate on Sept. 29, Britney's attorney, Mathew Rosengart, told PEOPLE that he was focused on "terminating the entire conservatorship and looking into the misconduct of Jamie Spears and others."

Now, a source close to the situation tells PEOPLE that is the main reason why Jamie needed new representation.

"Mathew Rosengart has asserted numerous times that he is going to investigate and sue Jamie," says the source. "If/when he does, Jamie will need to defend and likely be adverse to parties in the conservatorship."

On Oct. 15 Jamie filed court documents to have Alex Weingarten, a partner in Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP's litigation department, replace Vivian L. Thoreen, a partner at Holland & Knight, as his attorney in his daughter's conservatorship case.

"Vivian told Jamie he'll need a different litigator and that she and H&K weren't interested in that role — so Jamie authorized Vivian to help him find a strong litigator, which she did," says the source.

jamie spears
Britney Spears' father, Jamie Spears
| Credit: VALERIE MACON/Getty Images

Though Jamie and Thoreen are going their separate ways, the source says "Jamie is pleased with the work done" by Holland & Knight and that "he and Vivian remain in close touch during the transition."

"We are proud of our work on behalf of Jamie Spears and stand by his and our actions. We continue to have a good relationship, and are pleased that we have been able to help Jamie find new counsel," Thoreen said in a statement. "I am confident that Jamie's new counsel will continue to prove that he has always acted in Britney's best interests every step of the way."

Weingarten did not immediately respond to a request from PEOPLE for comment.

Britney's next court hearing is set for Nov. 12., and it's expected to focus on the potential termination of her conservatorship, which both Jamie and Britney, 39, filed petitions in September to end.

RELATED VIDEO: Jamie Spears Suspended: Experts Explain What This Means for Britney Spears' Conservatorship

Jamie stepped down in late 2019 as his daughter's personal conservator. (Jodi Montgomery, Britney's longtime care manager, replaced Jamie as the conservator of her person, responsible for medical decisions, while Jamie remained on as the conservator of her estate.)

In the months that followed, Britney fought in court to have her father removed from her conservatorship. Since getting her wish last month (accountant John Zabel is now temporarily in Jamie's role), "she is very hopeful," a source previously told PEOPLE. "Britney thinks everything will be totally different with Jamie out of her life."

Britney Spears
Britney Spears
| Credit: Ethan Miller/Getty

For his part, Jamie has defended his role as the conservator of Britney's estate and has insisted that he only ever had his daughter's best interest at heart.

"Mr. Spears loves his daughter Britney unconditionally. For 13 years, he has tried to do what is in her best interests, whether as a conservator or her father," read a statement released by Thoreen on Sept. 30.

"This started with agreeing to serve as her conservator when she voluntarily entered into the conservatorship. This included helping her revive her career and re-establish a relationship with her children," the statement continued. "For anyone who has tried to help a family member dealing with mental health issues, they can appreciate the tremendous amount of daily worry and work this required."

"Despite the suspension, Mr. Spears will continue to look out for the best interests of his daughter and work in good faith towards a positive resolution of all matters," the statement concluded.