Jamie Spears' lawyer Vivian L. Thoreen says his "love for his daughter and dedication to protecting her is clearly apparent to the court"

Advertisement

Jamie Spears' legal team says Britney Spears can file a motion to terminate her conservatorship "any time," but hasn't in the 13 years it has been in place.

In a statement to PEOPLE on Tuesday, Vivian L. Thoreen, Holland & Knight LLP, a lawyer for the popstar's father, 68, says the "Toxic" singer's best interests are periodically assessed by the courts to ensure wellbeing.

"From the beginning, the court has closely monitored Britney's situation, including through annual accountings and in-depth reviews and recommendations from a highly experienced and dedicated court investigator who annually meets at length with Britney and all involved in her conservatorship," Thoreen says.

"Britney's Conservatorship of the Estate was co-managed by a private professional fiduciary and her father until early 2019," she continues. "At that time, Britney requested in court papers that her father be the sole conservator of her estate. Her Conservatorship of the Person is not managed by her father but by a private professional fiduciary, and is similarly subject to the scrutiny of interviews, audits and detailed reports to the judge by the court investigator."

Jamie's attorney says he has "diligently and professionally carried out his duties as one of Britney's conservators, and his love for his daughter and dedication to protecting her is clearly apparent to the court."

Britney Spears, Jamie Spears
Britney Spears and Jamie Spears
| Credit: Steve Granitz/WireImage; Shutterstock

Want to get the biggest stories from PEOPLE every weekday? Subscribe to our new podcast, PEOPLE Every Day, to get the essential celebrity, entertainment and human interest news stories Monday through Friday.

"Any time Britney wants to end her conservatorship, she can ask her lawyer to file a petition to terminate it; she has always had this right but in 13 years has never exercised it," Thoreen claims. "Britney knows that her Daddy loves her, and that he will be there for her whenever and if she needs him, just as he always has been — conservatorship or not."

The statement from Jamie's attorney was released after Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida and Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio proposed bringing the issues of conservatorship and guardianship to Capitol Hill.

For more on what Rep. Matt Gaetz and Rep. Jim Jordan had to say about Britney Spears' conservatorship, listen below to the episode of PEOPLE Every Day.

Britney, 39, was first placed under a conservatorship in 2008, with the court originally naming her father the permanent conservator of her person and attorney Andrew Wallet the permanent co-conservator of her estate. Wallet retired from his role as co-conservator in June 2019.

In September 2019, Jamie stepped down as the permanent conservator due to "personal health reasons" and Jodi Montgomery, the licensed conservator, took his place.

Last summer, Britney filed court documents stating that she is "strongly opposed" to having her father return as sole conservator of her estate and instead "strongly prefers to have a qualified corporate fiduciary appointed to serve in this role."

The pop star suggested Bessemer Trust Company to serve as conservator of her estate in a later filing. The nomination was supported by Britney's mother, Lynne Spears, in a separate document. In November, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Brenda Penny appointed Bessemer and Jamie as co-conservators of Britney's estate.

Last month, Penny ruled that Bessemer Trust Company, a wealth management and investment advisory firm based out of California, will continue to be co-conservators along with Jamie, rejecting objections from Jamie's legal team over how the co-conservatorship would be delegated.

Additional hearings have been scheduled for Wednesday, March 17, and Tuesday, April 27.