Activist Park Sang-Hak has stated that he is not afraid of North Korea's threats over the balloon

By Alex Heigl
Updated March 10, 2015 08:30 AM
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Credit: Ed Araquel/CTMG; Inset: AP

If anyone in North Korea wanted to see The Interview, he or she is about to get 10,000 chances.

Tuesday, South Korean activists pledged to airdrop 10,000 copies of the Seth Rogen/James Franco film – and an additional 500,000 political leaflets – into the neighboring country by propaganda balloon around March 26.

The plan is timed to coincide with the five-year anniversary of the sinking of a South Korean warship, which the South blamed on the North. Forty-six sailors were killed, and the South ceased all trade and investment with the North as a response, reports the U.K. Guardian.

The South Korean government has upheld the activists’ right to send the leaflets as political expression, but has also urged against unnecessarily provoking their tetchy neighbors.

Speaking to that reputation, North Korea reportedly has warned that Park Sang-Hak, the defector who has led a series of balloon launches, will “pay for his crimes in blood” should copies of the film make it across the border.

The North Korean government, which has previously referred to Park as “human scum,” warned on its state-run website March 2 that it would respond to any balloons with “not just a few shots of gunfire but cannons or missiles.”

“Nobody can stop it. I will keep sending leaflets into North Korea at the risk of my life,” Park said, according to the Guardian.