Sean Penn was spotted out in Malibu picking up a sandwich and drink from his local grocery store

By Alexia Fernández
March 30, 2020 03:24 PM
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Sean Penn is taking extra measures in protecting himself against the coronavirus.

The actor, 59, was photographed in Malibu over the weekend wearing a white mask strapped to his face while carrying a water bottle and cradling a sandwich in his arm as he left a local grocery store.

Strapped to his belt and peaking out from under his tan coat, a small bottle of hand sanitizer can be seen.

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and the influx of cases in the United States, experts are unanimous in their recommendation that sanitizing your hands — whether by washing them with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer — is the best way to avoid infection.

Sean Penn
Sean Penn
| Credit: Marksman/ Snorlax / MEGA

If done correctly, experts estimate that sanitizing your hands can reduce the rate of infection by respiratory illness infection by 16 to 21 percent. To ensure you’re properly ridding your hands of germs, it’s recommended to apply the product to the palm of one of your hands, and then rub the product all over both of your hands until it’s completely dry.

The Centers for Disease Control is also urging people to practice social distancing to slow down the spread of the virus. Hollywood is already being affected by the pandemic as Tom Hanks, Idris Elba and more have tested positive for COVID-19.

Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson, both 63, returned to Los Angeles last Friday after quarantining in Australia for two weeks following their coronavirus diagnoses.

On Sunday, actor Daniel Dae Kim was also spotted walking his dog in Hawaii after quarantining following his own coronavirus diagnosis.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. To help provide doctors and nurses on the front lines with life-saving medical resources, donate to Direct Relief here.