The actress makes her return to Hollywood in Bridget Jones's Baby

By Jodi Guglielmi
September 05, 2016 09:45 AM

Renée Zellweger is back – and hopefully a “little less boring.”

Zellweger, 47, discussed her nearly six-year hiatus from Hollywood, admitting that she’s a changed person since taking a break from acting.

“I hope I’m a little less boring than I might have been after just 25 years of being an actress and being in that cycle of making films,” she said during a press conference for Bridget Jones’s Baby on Monday.

Zellweger said she decided to leave Hollywood in 2010 to “explore new things” and grow as a person outside of the entertainment industry.

“I wanted to learn something that had nothing to do with researching a character. I wanted to learn some things beyond the scope of what you are exposed to in film making in Hollywood. And I was craving a little normalcy,” she explained. “I wanted to learn something new and grow as a person and see if I had aptitude for these things that interest me. And if not now, it would be, ‘Oh in two more years, or three years, then ten years’, and then just, ultimately, you just don’t do them. And I didn’t want that to happen.”

So why return to Hollywood? The actress said despite getting to experience new things, she eventually felt pulled back to her acting roots.

“It was a really gradual thing. I just started looking around, reading some things. I was just curious and had missed it,” she said. “I have a new perspective. I worked on the other side of the camera quite a bit while I was taking a little filming hiatus.”

Zellweger reprises her role as the beloved Bridget Jones in Bridget Jones’s Baby – and the actress said she couldn’t imagine a better film to reintroduce her to acting world.

“To come back and begin again with this old, extended, dysfunctional family was a really nice way to begin again,” she said. “I am spoiled rotten for the friendships that I have on this set.”

Also starring Colin Firth and Patrick Dempsey, Bridget Jones’s Baby hits theaters Sept. 16.

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