Queen of Versailles star Jackie Siegel has been on an "emotional rollercoaster" since the death of her teen daughter

By Christine Pelisek
Updated June 11, 2015 08:45 PM
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Credit: Gerardo Mora/Getty

Queen of Versailles star Jackie Siegel has been on an “emotional rollercoaster” since the death of her teen daughter, says a family spokesperson.

Victoria Siegel, 18, was discovered at 2:05 p.m. Saturday by deputies at her family’s mansion on Green Island Cove, and taken to the Health Central Hospital, where she was pronounced dead. An autopsy was performed but the coroner has not yet ruled on a cause of death, though Victoria struggled with an addiction to prescription drugs.

Family spokesperson Michael Marder released a statement following the release of pictures of Jackie snapping photos of her daughter’s coffin as it was loaded into the hearse outside St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday.

“People deal with grief differently,” says Marder. “Mrs. Siegel is grieving as we all are. I have been with the family starting from the very first moment they learned of Victoria’s death and I can tell you that she has cried … a lot … and has been on an emotional roller coaster. There is no authoritative manual that tells us how to grieve.”

Marder says the Siegel family has been sleeping together in the large family room of the house since Victoria’s death.

“They are talking together, crying together, and caring for and loving each other,” he says. “The family has been through a terrible tragedy and has been hurt enough, and the way Mrs. Siegel is being portrayed by some in the media is just adding additional pain, not only to her, but to the entire family.”

Earlier this week, the family admitted that Victoria had struggled with an addiction to prescription drugs and that it was likely she “ingested one or more drugs prior to her death.”

The family also announced that Victoria may have been cyberbullied by her boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend hours before her death.

“The ex-girlfriend of Victoria’s boyfriend used his phone to send cruel and hateful text messages using the boyfriend’s phone,” Marder says. “These messages were sent early on the morning of Victoria’s death. These messages were clearly intended to hurt Victoria and while we cannot be sure may have affected her emotional state at a time when she was emotionally vulnerable.”

Marder says that a few days before her death, Victoria, who was affectionately called Hippie Rikki, was “upbeat and happy.”

Orange County Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Jeff Williamson tells PEOPLE the investigation into Victoria’s death is still “open and ongoing.”

“At this point we are not looking for any individual,” he says.