"I think this feminism can go too far," former Baywatch actress Pamela Anderson said on Sunday's 60 Minutes Australia 

By Dana Rose Falcone
November 07, 2018 06:34 PM
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Pamela Anderson considers herself a feminist, but thinks today’s version of the advocacy practice feels dull.

“I think this feminism can go too far,” the actress, 51, said on Sunday’s 60 Minutes Australia. “I’m a feminist, but I think that this third wave of feminism is a bore. I think it paralyzes men.”

She went on to bash the #MeToo movement.

“I think that this #MeToo movement is a bit too much for me,” Anderson continued. “I’m sorry, I’ll probably get killed for saying that.”

The former Baywatch star victim-blamed Harvey Weinstein‘s accusers and claimed she would’ve never put herself in their positions.

Anderson in Paris in September.
Stephane Cardinale/Corbis/Getty

“My mother taught me: Don’t go into a hotel with a stranger. And if someone answers the door in a bathrobe and it’s supposed to be a business meeting, maybe I should go with somebody else,” Anderson said. “I think that some things are just common sense. Or if you go in, get the job.”

Anderson blamed her bluntness during the interview on her nationality.

“I’m Canadian,” she said. “I’m going to speak my mind, okay? I’m sorry. I’m sorry, I’m not politically correct, maybe.”

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Sunday’s segment with Liam Bartlett didn’t mark the first time Anderson chided women for their experiences with Weinstein, who was indicted on charges of rape and criminal sexual assault in May, and faced additional charges in July. (The disgraced producer, 66, pled not guilty to the rape charges in June.)

“It was common knowledge that certain producers or certain people in Hollywood to avoid, privately,” Anderson said on Megyn Kelly Today in November 2017. “You know what you’re getting into if you’re going into a hotel room alone.”

When discussing how some of Weinstein’s accusers were lured under false pretenses by agents or female assistants, Anderson said that didn’t matter.

“That’s what they should have done. Send somebody with them,” she continued to Kelly. “I think there’s easy ways to remedy that. That’s not a good excuse.”