"Fight for You" from Judas and the Black Messiah won the Oscar for Best Song and beat out music from four other films, including songs from The Trial of the Chicago 7 and One Night in Miami…

By Salina Tsegai
April 25, 2021 11:09 PM
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"Fight for You" from Judas and the Black Messiah won the Oscar for Best Song at the Academy Awards this Sunday.

Written by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas and performed by H.E.R., the song was up against "Hear My Voice" from The Trial of the Chicago 7, "Húsavík" from Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga, "Io Sì (SEEN)" from The Life Ahead (La Vita Davanti a Se) and "Speak Now" from One Night in Miami…

"I did not expect to win this award. I am so, so, so grateful, not only to win but to be a part of such an important story," singer H.E.R., whose real name is Gabriella Sarmiento Wilson, said in her acceptance speech.

"Musicians, filmmakers, I believe we have an opportunity and a responsibility, to tell the truth, and to write history the way that it was, and how it connects us to today, and what we see going on in the world today. I have no words, I'm so, so thankful," H.E.R., 23, continued.

Ending her speech on an inspirational note, she added, "Knowledge is power, music is power, and as long as I'm standing, I'm always gonna fight for us. I'm always gonna fight for my people and fight for what's right, and I think that's what music does, and that's what storytelling does."

The Oscar for Best Song was presented by Zendaya.

This is the Grammy-winner's first Oscar nomination and win. 

H.E.R., born Gabriella Wilson, is no stranger to making music about social justice. 

At the 2021 Grammy Awards, the singer and her "Fight For You" collaborators Emile II and Thomas snagged "Song of the Year" for the protest ballad "I Can't Breathe," inspired by George Floyd, who was killed in police custody last May. 

The Oscar winner spoke with PEOPLE in March and said she felt that music had the power to influence people.

"What's crazy about music is; music influences people," she said. "It's like timestamps. It helps so much when it comes to history and explaining what's going on. It's a language that everybody speaks."

When the 23-year-old musician was tapped to write music for Judas and the Black Messiah, she knew it wouldn't be difficult to draw from the present while honoring the past. 

"I wanted to create a universal message that represented what is still happening today and how that connects two generations. We're passing the torch and continuing on Hampton's work." the singer told Variety

The 93rd Academy Awards are airing live on ABC at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT.