"I can tell you that if I made any of my films, I don’t think I’d last,” the director-producer said

By Alexia Fernandez
July 30, 2020 06:01 PM
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Oliver Stone
Gisela Schober/Getty

Oliver Stone thinks his career might have been completely different if he were attempting to establish himself in today’s culture.

The director appeared on the SiriusXM radio show Jim Norton & Sam Roberts where host Jim Norton asked Stone, 73, what he thought of modern Hollywood.

Stone admitted he had “no idea” where his career would have gone if he were just starting out.

“I’m really out of touch. I can tell you that if I made any of my films, I don’t think I’d last,” Stone said. “I’d be vilified. I’d be attacked. Shamed.”

He added, “Whatever you want to call that… culture, cancel f—ing culture. I mean it’s just impossible.”

In 2017, former Playboy model Carrie Stevens and actresses Patricia Arquette and Melissa Gilbert accused Stone of sexual misconduct. Stone did not respond to Stevens and Arquette's claims, but told Deadline of Gilbert's accusations of a "humiliating and horrid" audition process for 1991's The Doors that he aimed to "ensure a safe environment for all actors who auditioned."

“I would have had to step on so many sensitivities,” Stone continued on SiriusXM. “You have to have some freedom to make a movie, unfortunately. You have to be rude. You can be bad. And you’re going to have to do these things like step on toes. Holy cow. Do you think I could have made any one of those films?”

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Stone has directed a slew of films including Wall Street, Platoon, JFK, Any Given Sunday, Alexander, W., World Trade Center and Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

The director earned 11 Academy Award nominations and picked up three wins: in 1979 for Best Adapted Screenplay for Midnight Express, in 1987 for Best Director on Platoon and 1990 in the same category for Born on the Fourth of July.

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