The premiere of Meryl Streep's Suffragette was protested by Sisters Uncut in London

By Michael Miller
October 07, 2015 08:00 PM
Tristan Fewings/Getty

A group of women’s rights protesters interrupted the premiere of Meryl Streep’s new film, in which she plays a women’s rights activist.

The protesters, who are part of a group called Sisters Uncut, laid their bodies on the red carpet at the London premiere of Suffragette on Wednesday, and had to be carried away by security. It’s unclear if Streep was present at the time of the protest.

According to the group’s Facebook page, the demonstration was meant to express their outrage over Parliament’s recent decision to cut funding for domestic violence services.

“To those in power, our message is this: your cuts are sexist, your cuts are dangerous, and you think that you can get away with them because you have targeted the people who you perceive as powerless,”a post on Sisters Uncut’s page says. “We are those people, we are women, we will not be silenced.”

The group has not specified whether their protest was in response to the film, or they were simply using the red carpet as a means of gaining exposure.

In addition to starring as a women’s suffrage pioneer in the movie, Streep has long been a champion of women’s rights, and recently spoken out against what she says is a shocking lack of female critics in the film industry.

Calling it “infuriating” that box office buzz is drummed up by an overwhelming majority of male critics, Streep tells BBC, “If men don’t look around the the board of governors table and feel something is wrong when half the people there are not women then we’re not going to make any progress.”

The Oscar-winner tells the website that according to her research, only 168 out of 928 reviewers on Rotten Tomatoes are female, and that there are only 2 women working for The New York Film Critics circle compared to 37 men.

“Men and women are not the same, sometimes their tastes diverge,” Streep told NPR. “The word isn’t disheartening It’s infuriating. People accept this as received wisdom … we need inclusion.”

Streep also recently wrote 535 members of Congress calling to revive the Equal Rights Amendment. “I sent them each a book called Equal Means Equal by Jessica Neuwirth,” said Streep, according to The Hollywood Reporter. “It’s about the revival of the attempt to get an ERA that would codify in law that you can’t discriminate against women. I got five answers.”

Suffragette hits theaters Oct. 23.

Advertisement