"I don't know if anyone's had a boob fight [on screen before]," McCarthy told Refinery29

By Mariah Haas
Updated March 30, 2016 12:00 AM
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Melissa McCarthy is sounding off about Twitter haters, weight loss and a hilarious scene in her new movie The Boss.

First off, McCarthy reveals that fans can expect to see a boob fight between herself and Kristen Bell in their upcoming comedy.

“I don’t know if anyone’s had a boob fight [on screen before],” McCarthy tells Refinery29 in a new interview. “I can’t think of one, but if there’s been a boob fight, it’s been like, slap-and-tickle pillow fights at sororities. To me, that’s the kind of thing that at, like, 14 you learn is inappropriate.”

“But Michelle never had friends,” McCarthy – whose character Michelle Darnell fondles with Claire’s (Bell) chest in the film – adds. “Twenty years later, she s having weird teenage stuff happen. It was like, ‘I guess you help your friends with their boobs.'”

Aside from her new film, the actress also discussed the media’s attention on appearances.

Asked about weight loss, McCarthy, 45, says: “I have, but I’ll be back again. I’ll be up, I’ll be down, probably for the rest of my life. The thing is, if that is the most interesting thing about me, I need to go have a lavender farm in Minnesota and give this up.”

“There has to be something more,” she continues. “There are so many more intriguing things about women than their butt or their this or their that. It can’t be the first question every time, or a question at all.”

McCarthy went on to explain what it would be like if her male colleagues were asked the same question.

“It’s like, ‘Can you imagine them asking some of these guys I work with, ‘How do you keep your butt looking so good?'” she said. “It would be like, ‘What the f— are you talking about? Why are you asking about the shape of my butt?'”

As for the racial controversy, Ghostbusters – another upcoming film she’s starring in – recently faced, McCarthy says it’s “so off-base” and people should “just stop trying to stir up the craziness.”

“It can never be positive. It always has to be negative,” says McCarthy of people looking for provocative stuff to write about. “It s like whoever can throw s— the farthest gets their two minutes.”

“You know you could flip that and shine a light on something and write a great story and still get your two minutes,” she adds. “I wish it was as fashionable to raise people up as it seems to be to take them down.”

The Boss hits theaters on April 8, 2016.