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Amanda Gorman's empowering poem delivered during Wednesday's inauguration included two references to the Broadway hit Hamilton

By Georgia Slater
January 21, 2021 10:29 AM
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History had its eyes on Amanda Gorman during Wednesday's inauguration ceremony in Washington, D.C.

After Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were sworn in as the President and Vice President of the United States, the 22-year-old poet took the stage to recite her empowering poem: "The Hill We Climb."

Her inspirational piece caught the attention of viewers around the world, including Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda

On Thursday, Gorman appeared on Good Morning America where she received a special surprise message from the star, congratulating her on her amazing performance.

"Good morning Amanda Gorman, it's Lin-Miranda. Congrats again on yesterday," he said, prompting Gorman to nearly fall off her seat.

amanda Gorman
Credit: GMA/ Twitter

"The right words in the right order can change the world, and you proved that yesterday with your brilliant piece. I'm so incredibly proud of you and I can't wait to see what you write next," he continued. "Keep changing the world, one word at a time. You smashed it!"

Shocked by Miranda's message, Gorman told GMA's Robin Roberts, "I almost fell out of my chair."

"That's amazing!" the poet exclaimed with a huge smile on her face.

On Wednesday, Gorman had reached out to Miranda herself on Twitter, asking if he had caught the Hamilton references she used in her poem.

"Did you catch the 2 @HamiltonMusical references in the inaugural poem? I couldn't help myself!" she asked Miranda, to which he replied "YES @TheAmandaGorman!!! -LMM"

"You were perfect. Perfectly written, perfectly delivered. Every bit of it. Brava!" he added in a follow-up tweet.

One example of a Hamilton reference is when Gorman said, "history has its eyes on us," a direct callout to the musical's song "History Has Its Eyes on You."

Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman
Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman speaks at the inauguration of U.S. President Joe Biden
| Credit: Rob Carr/Getty

Following the inauguration on Wednesday, Gorman spoke to CNN's Anderson Cooper about how Hamilton influenced her work, revealing that she used the song "Aaron Burr, Sir" to help overcome a speech impediment.

"I would try to keep up with Leslie Odom Jr. as he's doing this amazing rap, and I'd say, 'If I can train myself to do this song, then I can train myself to say this letter,' " she said. "And so that's been a huge part of my own speech pathology. It's why I included it in the inaugural poem."

"Also, beyond that, I think Hamilton is just such a great American cultural piece of what it means to be a better country. It was really hard for me not to just copy and paste 'My Shot' and email it to the committee," she continued. "Like, 'Here's my poem, here we go!' But I cite my sources, which is why I tweeted about Hamilton. I'm really proud to incorporate that in there."