The star took home the statue for his role in Green Book during Sunday night's 76th annual Golden Globes Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in California

By Joelle Goldstein
January 06, 2019 09:51 PM
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Mahershala Ali is this year’s best supporting actor in a motion picture but he is thanking those who have supported him!

Ali, 44, took home the statue for his role in Green Book during Sunday night’s 76th annual Golden Globes Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in California.

“My fellow nominees thank you, appreciate you, appreciate your work,” Ali said. He also thanked his costar Viggo Mortensen, saying, “Viggo, you are an extraordinary scene partner.”

“You pushed me every day, no days off. Even the days off weren’t days off. Thank you, brother, I love you,” he added.

The actor also thanked the three most important figures in his life.

“Lastly, I have to thank my wife, my mother and my grandmother. I thank you for your prayers, I’ve needed each and every one of them,” he said.

Mahershala Ali
NBC

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This is Ali’s second Golden Globe nomination. His first nod was in 2017 for his role as the sympathetic father figure/drug dealer Juan in the indie drama Moonlight.

Green Book centers on Dr. Don Shirley, a world-class African-American pianist who goes on a concert tour, played by Ali. In need of a driver and bodyguard, Shirley hires Tony Lip, played by Viggo Mortensen, while the two confront racism and segregation in the Deep South.

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Of the film being an awards season contender, Ali told Essence in November that “it didn’t cross my mind.”

“What I was thinking when I read the script was this is an amazing character,” he said. “Don Shirley had the capacity to play extraordinarily complicated music that was deemed white music. And it’s not that he’s not good enough to play it, he’s just not white enough to play it. It’s an idea that Black people have existed for centuries in this country from the standpoint of living compromised lives.”

Patti Perret/Universal