Elizabeth Banks and Max Handelman attended the University of Pennsylvania, where they met on their very first day

By Ale Russian
November 22, 2019 11:30 AM

Elizabeth Banks and her husband Max Handelman met on their first day of college — and they’re still together 27 years later.

Banks, 45, and Handelman, 46, attended the University of Pennsylvania, where Banks went on to graduate as magna cum laude. But her biggest accomplishment stemming from her college years is her thriving relationship with her husband.

The two married in 2003 and have since welcomed two sons: Felix, 8, and Magnus, 7.

“Twenty seven years. It’s the thing I’m most proud of,” she recently told PORTER of her relationship. “I do think people grow together or they grow apart. We definitely grew together. We were constantly making decisions that kept us close.”

RELATED: Elizabeth Banks Is ‘Proud’ of Charlie’s Angels After It Is a ‘Flop’ at the Box Office

One of those decision was starting their Brownstone Productions company, which came about after Banks “dragged him into the industry.” Handelman was working on Wall Street when she convinced him to join her on the venture in 2002.

“He worked an 80-hour week; I was traveling all the time in a career that requires me to film on location for up to six months of the year. Forming the company really was about trying to combine our professional and personal goals,” she explained.

Elizabeth Banks and Max Handelman
Jeff Spicer/Getty

The company has since produced all three Pitch Perfect movies, with Banks taking over as director for the sequel, as well as this year’s Charlie’s Angels.

In the interview, Banks also admitted that she’s “a little traditional when it comes to marriage. I think there are people that go into marriage thinking: ‘If it doesn’t work, I’ll get divorced.’ That’s not me. You’re going to have bad moments. You’ve committed to something. Do you value it or don’t you?”

The actress and Handelman welcomed both of their sons through surrogacy due to what she calls her “broken belly,” and Banks said she’s glad reproductive issues are becoming less taboo for women to talk about.

“I definitely think I’m still judged for what I’ve done and that people don’t understand my choices, but I don’t feel I owe anybody any explanation,” she explained. “And, if my story helps people feel less alone on their journey, then I’m grateful for that.”

Charlie’s Angels is in theaters now.

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