Candice Bergen stars alongside Diane Keaton Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen in the new movie Book Club and the four women sat down with PEOPLE to talk about love, beauty, friendship and more

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Candice Bergen knows a thing or two about suffering for beauty.

Bergen, 72, stars alongside Diane Keaton, 72, Jane Fonda, 80, and Mary Steenburgen, 65, in the new movie Book Club (in theaters May 18) and the four women sat down with PEOPLE in the latest issue to talk about love, beauty, friendship and more.

When it comes to beauty secrets, Bergen says that she uses Mila Moursi creams and once had a terrible experience getting injections from her dermatologist.

“I have had those shots a few times,” Bergen says. “The last time I had them, I fainted—I’m so pain-averse.”

BOOK CLUB
Mary Steenburgen, Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda and Candice Bergen
| Credit: Paramount Pictures

The rest of the ladies went into their beauty routines, too — including their workouts and what keeps them looking beautiful. While Fonda jokes that Steenburgen’s secret is her long marriage to actor Ted Danson, she reveals that she works on strengthening a specific part of her body.

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“My tip is good genes and a lot of money,” Fonda jokes. “And posture. I broke my back diving when I was 13, so I’ve spent a lot of time making my back strong.”

“I have something to say about Jane’s back,” Steenburgen replies. “We did this scene where we were dressing her, and I’m staring at her back, going, how the hell does her back look like that? That’s an incredible back. Beautiful.”

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Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen in Book Club
| Credit: Paramount Pictures

Steenburgen also gets real about the perceptions people have about beauty and aging.

“When I was younger I was fine-looking, but I was never on magazine covers or any of that stuff. And then as I got older, it’s like, ‘Damn, you look good,’ ” Steenburgen says. “The unspoken part is ‘for your age.’ And I’m like, ‘Thank you, I’ll take it.’ ”