Camila Morrone and Leonardo DiCaprios were first linked together in January 2018 during an outing in Aspen, Colorado

By Georgia Slater
January 14, 2020 12:38 PM

Camila Morrone is opening up about the difficulties of being thrown into the spotlight — especially when dating an A-listers like Leonardo DiCaprio.

The 22-year old actress — who is featured in WSJ Magazine’s Young Hollywood Portfolio — admitted that the attention she’s received from her relationship with DiCaprio, 45, doesn’t come without its downsides.

“More exposure leads to more judgment and negativity,” the up-and-coming actress said. “It’s a little bit of a bummer because you’re really trying to do good work and be nice and be a good person, and in the meantime…people wish negative things upon you.”

Despite the backlash, Morrone told the outlet that she is able to keep the comments from getting to her head.

“It would never take away the joy of the craft that I get to do,” she added.

RELATED: Leonardo DiCaprio and Girlfriend Camila Morrone Spend Cheeky New Year’s Eve in St. Barts

Campbell Addy for WSJ. Magazine

The two were first linked together in January 2018 during an outing in Aspen, Colorado. Ever since then, DiCaprio and Morrone have been spotted all over the world together, often enjoying beach vacations.

The actress, who has received buzz for her breakout role in the independent film Mickey and the Bear, recently spoke about her relationship with DiCaprio, saying their 23-year age gap doesn’t bother her.

“There’s so many relationships in Hollywood — and in the history of the world — where people have large age gaps,” Morrone told the Los Angeles Times early last month. “I just think anyone should be able to date who they want to date.”

Christopher Jue/Getty; FADEL SENNA/AFP via Getty

Morrone, who made a name for herself modeling before she turned to acting, said she understands why people are interested in her relationship with DiCaprio, saying, “I probably would be curious about it, too.”

Despite that, Morrone said she looks forward to a time when she begins to gain recognition for her work and talent.

“I think more and more now that people are seeing the film, I’m slowly getting an identity outside of that,” she said. “Which is frustrating, because I feel like there should always be an identity besides who you’re dating.”

She added, “I understand the association, but I’m confident that will continue to slip away and be less of a conversation.”

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