The auction features item such as her "International Stardom" Golden Globe award, a bound screenplay of Miracle on 34th Street, a group of 1960s wardrobe test photos and more

By Jodi Guglielmi
Updated November 23, 2015 01:45 PM
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Credit: Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty

Just days before the 34th anniversary of Natalie Wood‘s tragic death, a collection of the actress’ personal belongings are being put up for auction.

As part of the third annual movie memorabilia auction presented by TCM titled “Treasures from the Dream Factory,” items from both Wood’s professional and personal life will be sold to the highest bidder on Monday at Bonhams auction house.

The auction features item such as her “International Stardom” Golden Globe award, a bound screenplay of Miracle on 34th Street, a group of 1960s wardrobe test photos, an Italian ruby 18k gold bracelet, as well as her childhood report cards and diplomas.

The items are being presented by Wood’s husband, Robert Wagner, and her daughters, Natasha Gregson Wagner and Courtney Brooke Wagner.

“So much of this memorabilia has just been sitting around in a storage room since 1982 and I thought it would be nice for it to be seen, for the public to have some of it,” Natasha said in the Bonhams auction notes.

This year’s auction also includes other high-ticket items including a Golden Ticket from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Steve McQueen’s racing suit from Le Mans and a dress worn by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz.

Previous movie memorabilia auctions have turned high profits from people willing to pay top dollar for some of Hollywood’s most iconic items. In 2014 Sam’s piano from Rick’s Café in Casablanca sold for $3.2 million, and the Maltese Falcon sold for $4.2 million in 2013.

However, Wood’s inclusion in the sale has stirred controversy amongst those who believe the Wagner family should have donated her belongings to a museum, rather than to sell.

Mike McCrann, a Frontiers Media columnist who worked on an unpublished biography of Wood in the 1970s, wrote that Wood “deserved better” in an op-ed dedicated to the subject.

“It is a cinematic sin not to have all her movie-related memorabilia in one place,” he wrote. “Shame on Robert Wagner and his family for allowing this to happen.”

Wood died on Nov. 29, 1981, when she drowned while on a weekend boat trip near Catalina Island, California, with Wagner and her Brainstorm costar, Christopher Walken. The details surrounding her death remain unknown.