More than four dozen schools are requiring faculty to teach their classes remotely to avoid large, confined gatherings of people

By Rachel DeSantis
March 11, 2020 03:50 PM

A number of U.S. colleges and universities have taken the precautionary measure of suspending or canceling classes as the coronavirus continues to spread.

What began for many schools as a ban on travel to affected areas has since evolved, with many now requiring faculty to teach their lessons remotely through the internet.

The respiratory illness — which began in Wuhan, China in late December and has since spread across the globe —prompted the World Health Organization to declare a public health emergency, the first since the zika epidemic in 2016.

Multiple states, including Ohio and New Jersey, have declared states of emergency amid the outbreak, which has so far killed 31 people in the United States as of Wednesday afternoon, according to The New York Times.

At Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, school President Lawrence Bacow told students that classes will be transitioning to virtual instruction by March 23 — and that students shouldn’t return to campus after the school’s spring break.

Dean of the College Rakesh Khurana also told students they were required to move out of their houses and first-year dorms no later than Sunday, March 15. Some students expressed concerns over making travel arrangements in such a short amount of time, and the school directed them to the Financial Aid Office for assistance.

Allen J. Schaben/Getty Images

It remains unclear if students’ room and board will be refunded for the semester. Harvard did not provide further clarification on extenuating circumstances when reached by PEOPLE, though the school’s FAQ page said “a small number of delays or exceptions” would be made in the cases of students who could not move until after March 15.

Meanwhile, in New Jersey, Princeton’s Dean of the College Jill Dolan mandated that faculty start teaching classes remotely until at least April 5, with a possible extension into the end of the semester, and acknowledged that while “students are devastated by this turn of events… it’s just not possible for all of them to stay.”

See below for a list of other schools that have halted in-person classes for the time being as of March 11.

California: There are 178 confirmed cases of coronavirus in California, and so far three people have died.

Connecticut: There are two confirmed cases of coronavirus in Connecticut.

Florida: There are 23 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Florida, and so far two people have died.

Massachusetts: There are 92 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Massachusetts.

Maryland: There are nine confirmed cases of coronavirus in Maryland.

Michigan: There are two confirmed cases of coronavirus in Michigan.

Nebraska: There are 18 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Nebraska.

RELATED: Here’s a Map of All the Coronavirus Cases in the U.S.

New Jersey: There are 23 confirmed cases of coronavirus in New Jersey, and so far one person has died.

New York: There are 212 confirmed cases of coronavirus in New York.

North Carolina: There are seven confirmed cases of coronavirus in North Carolina.

Ohio: There are four confirmed cases of coronavirus in Ohio.

Pennsylvania: There are 15 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Pennsylvania.

Tennessee: There are seven confirmed cases of coronavirus in Tennessee.

Texas: There are 31 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Texas.

Virginia: There are nine confirmed cases of coronavirus in Virginia.

Washington: There are 280 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Washington, and so far 24 people have died.

Advertisement