LIVE

Caden Cotnoir alerted Trent Jarrett's family about the crash by calling the phone number that Jarrett was calling out

By Joelle Goldstein
April 07, 2021 01:57 PM
Advertisement

A New Hampshire teen has become a hero after saving the life of a West Virginia boy who crashed his ATV live on TikTok.

Trent Jarrett told ABC affiliate WMUR that he's forever grateful to Caden Cotnoir for alerting his family about the crash, despite being over 800 miles away.

"I'd just like to thank him for everything that he's done," Jarrett, 12, explained to the outlet.

The scary incident unfolded as Jarrett was riding his four-wheeler and live-streaming it on TikTok, according to WMUR.

Cotnoir — who follows Jarrett on TikTok due to their shared interests of hunting, fishing and four-wheeling — told the outlet he happened to be watching the live stream when he realized something was wrong.

"All of a sudden his phone goes kind of blank, you can see a little bit of light and you can just hear him yelling for help," Cotnoir, 13, recalled to WMUR.

Though Cotnoir couldn't fully make out what had happened, he told the outlet he heard Jarrett calling out numbers.

"I was yelling out my grandparents' house phone number," Jarrett explained to WMUR, adding that their phone number was the only one he could remember at the time.

Thankfully, Cotnoir was able to recognize what Jarrett was asking and immediately called his grandparents to alert them of the situation, WMUR reported.

Jarrett's parents later found their son under the ATV, where he had been trapped for approximately 20 minutes, and managed to lift the four-wheeler off of him, according to the outlet.

RELATED VIDEO: Twitter Goes Crazy After Man Saves a Boy From Being Hit in Face by Baseball Bat

Luckily, the teen only suffered cuts and bruises from the incident, WMUR reported.

In the wake of the crash, Jarrett and Cotnoir — who never met before — had the opportunity to virtually meet over Zoom on Monday, according to the outlet.

It was a moment that the boys may not have shared otherwise, if it had not been for Cotnoir's heroic actions, his stepfather, Matt Currier, told WMUR.

"He did was he was supposed to do and got the right people and it worked out," said Currier, who works as the chief of the Gilmanton Police Department in New Hampshire.

"It was an Easter miracle," Currier added.