Josh Crowell has delivered over 25 gift cards to 2020 graduates on his route in New Hampshire

By Eric Todisco
May 17, 2020 05:15 PM
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US Postal Service worker Josh Crowell is brightening the days of 2020 graduates who were unable to walk across the stage due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Crowell, who began working for the post office in November 2019, has been leaving $5 Dunkin' Donuts gift cards in the mailboxes of recent graduates throughout his route near Concord, New Hampshire.

"$5 isn't much, but it's something so that the kids can get out of the house and go get a donut and an iced coffee," Crowell told CNN.

Along with the gift card, Crowell has also been leaving a handwritten note, congratulating the 2020 graduates and signing it, "Your mailman Josh." He said he's delivered at least 25 gift cards thus far.

The senior graduates have expressed their gratitude to Crowell by sending him notes back in the mail to thank him for his kindness and generosity.

"This year has not been easy for most, but I think being able to make someone's day is important. ... Thank you for being an essential worker, it means a lot," one note read.

Crowell said he understands the seniors' desire to graduate together in-person, given that he has two daughters, one of whom graduated high school in 2018.

"She had some issues in school learning-wise so she struggled," Crowell said of his daughter. "To know that she was able to graduate and walk across the stage and get her diploma was very meaningful for her and for me. To know that the students for 2020 are not going to be able to do that is hard and sad."

Crowell shared that he's been using his personal money to purchase the Dunkin' Donuts gift cards. "I'm not very well-off myself, but I look at it as, if I put a smile on somebody's face, then I will do it," he said.

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