Wynta-Amor Rogers went viral when her mom posted a video of the 7-year-old chanting during a protest

By Ally Mauch
June 06, 2020 10:50 AM
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Wynta-Amor Rogers is proof that even the smallest voices can make an impact.

The first-grader from Long Island, New York, went viral on social media when her mom, Lakyia Jackson, posted a video of the 7-year-old at a protest earlier this week.

In the video, the child can be seen passionately chanting “No justice, no peace” alongside fellow protestors. “I want everybody to get together, make sure a big community comes in,” Wynta-Amor said Friday.

Jackson said her daughter insisted on attending the protest, which took place in the wake of George Floyd’s murder.

Scripps National News

Floyd died in police custody on May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for over eight minutes while three others stood idly by. His death has led to nationwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice.

The officer involved, Derek Chauvin, has since been fired and charged with second-degree murder, and the three other officers on the scene, also fired, were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter. None have entered a formal plea.

“She said ‘Mom, please let’s go,’ ” Jackson told reporters. “I said, ‘No, because it’s wet outside,’ she said, ‘No, I want to go mom, I want to go.’ ”

Jackson added that she shrugs off negative commenters on social media who say that her child should not have been at the peaceful protest, noting that young people are “our future.”

“We have to let our future see what’s going on also,” she said.

“You want to make a difference like who?” Jackson later prompted, looking at her daughter.

“Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” she replied.

To help combat systemic racism, consider learning from or donating to these organizations:

• Campaign Zero (joincampaignzero.org) which works to end police brutality in America through research-proven strategies.

ColorofChange.org works to make government more responsive to racial disparities.

• National Cares Mentoring Movement (caresmentoring.org) provides social and academic support to help black youth succeed in college and beyond.