Anyone who retweeted Yusaku Maezawa's post was entered into a lottery for a chance to win the money

By Georgia Slater
January 09, 2020 09:58 AM

Can money really buy happiness? Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa is about to find out.

The wealthy entrepreneur — who in 2018 bought every seat on SpaceX’s anticipated BFR rocket trip around the moon — is giving away a million yen (roughly $9,000) to 1,000 of his Twitter followers with the hope of testing the correlation between money and happiness.

Maezawa explained the rules of his “serious social experiment” in a YouTube video, sharing that all his followers had to do to enter was retweet his Jan. 1 post by Jan. 7 for the chance to win.

“We will give 1 million yen to 1000 people! I wish your life will be happier with 1 million yen. The application method is follow me and retweet of this tweet,” Maezawa, 44, wrote in the tweet, which has since been translated.

According to Business Insider, Maezawa expressed curiosity about universal basic income in the video.

The winners are encouraged to use their earnings “as they like” and will then be asked questions through regular surveys about their spending. Maezawa also asked for any social scientists or economists to reach out to him via email to help conduct the experiment.

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Anyone who retweeted Maezawa’s post — which has since garnered 4.1 million retweets — would be put into a lottery to choose the 1,000 lucky recipients. The online fashion mogul said he would then direct message the winners personally within two to three days, according to a translation from CNN.

Maezawa — who is estimated to be worth $2 billion, according to Forbes —  is no stranger to spending exponentially high prices.

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Aside from chartering a flight to space for aspiring artists, he made headlines in 2017 after he bought a Jean-Michel Basquiat painting for $110 million, the highest price for a piece of artwork by an American artist.

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